June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Incidence and clinical characteristics of epiretinal membrane developing after posterior vitreous detachment.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gavin S Tan
    Singapore National Eye Centre, Mountain View, CA
    Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
  • Mark S Blumenkranz
    Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Gavin Tan, None; Mark Blumenkranz, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 1209. doi:
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      Gavin S Tan, Mark S Blumenkranz; Incidence and clinical characteristics of epiretinal membrane developing after posterior vitreous detachment.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):1209.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To describe the incidence and clinical characteristics of epiretinal membrane (ERM) developing after posterior vitreous detachment (PVD), in a patient population presenting to a tertiary eye care centre.

Methods: We identified subjects that presented with acute symptoms of PVD to the ophthalmology clinics at Stanford university. Optical coherence tomography(OCT) was performed to confirm the presence of PVD. Subjects with pre-existing ERM and other ocular conditions which may cause secondary ERM (eg: retinal vein occlusion, uveitis, diabetic retinopathy, trauma) were excluded. Subjects were followed up for at least 2 years for the development of ERM on repeat OCT.

Results: 157 subjects were included over a 1 year period. The mean age of subjects presenting with PVD was 65.2 (+/-11.0) years. 7 eyes (4.5%) developed ERM within the followup period. Epiretinal membrane was diagnosed on OCT on average 289 days (+/-235) after PVD. The incidence of retinal tears after PVD was similar in the group that developed ERM (14%) and the group that did not develop ERM (12%) (p=0.856). All cases with tears had laser retinopexy performed. Mean visual acuity was worse in the ERM group (20/38) compared with the No ERM group (20/26) (p=0.01). 43% of ERM cases had visual acuity worse than 20/40.

Conclusions: ERM is diagnosed an average of 9 months after PVD and results in worse VA than those without ERM. Retinal tears occurring after the PVD was not a risk factor for developing ERM.

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