June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Spectral domain optical coherence tomography evaluation of retinal neovascularization after panretinal photocoagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Irini Chatziralli
    Laser and Retina Research Department, King's College Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Sobha Sivaprasad
    Laser and Retina Research Department, King's College Hospital, Athens, Greece
    NIHR Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Irini Chatziralli, None; Sobha Sivaprasad, Allergan (F), Allergan (R), Bayer (F), Bayer (R), Novartis (F), Novartis (R), Roche (F), Roche (R)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 1801. doi:
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      Irini Chatziralli, Sobha Sivaprasad; Spectral domain optical coherence tomography evaluation of retinal neovascularization after panretinal photocoagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):1801.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Retinal neovascularisation (NV) in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) has been recently described using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). However, the progression of retinal NV after panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) in SD-OCT has not been reported. We performed a retrospective, observational clinical study to evaluate the effect of the location of NV in relation to the ILM on the time to regression of retinal NV.

 
Methods
 

47 patients with PDR were included in this study. They were 30 male and 17 female with mean age 58.5±13.8 years, followed-up at King’s College Hospital, London, UK between January 2011 and January 2014, having at least 6 months follow-up. All participants presented retinal NV elsewhere, which was located inside the vascular arcades, so as to be identified using infrared fundus photo and SD-OCT directly over the region of the abnormal vessels. Neovascularization was classified as “above internal limiting membrane (ILM)” (group 1, n=22) or “below ILM” (group 2, n=25) based on SD-OCT. All patients underwent PRP using PASCAL (Pattern SCAn Laser; Topcon Medical Laser Systems). The two groups were compared regarding the regression of NV and the time to regression. Log-rank test for equality of survivor function was used for statistical analysis, using SPSS 20.0 statistical software.

 
Results
 

The median time of retinal NV regression was 8 months after PRP for the “above ILM” group and 3 months for the “below ILM” group (p=0.023). This finding is clearly depicted on the respective Kaplan-Meier graph (Figure). The mean follow-up time was 18.6±4.5 months.

 
Conclusions
 

Our results showed that patients with retinal NV “above ILM” presented a significantly slower regression time of NV after PRP in comparison with those having NV “below ILM”. SD-OCT seems to be a valuable non-invasive tool in the monitoring of retinal NV in PDR and could potentially predict the progression of the NV based on its baseline location regarding the retina.  

 
Kaplan-Meier graph, showing that patients with retinal neovascularization above the internal limiting membrane present significantly slower regression of the neovascularization after panretinal photocoagulation in comparison with those having the neovascularization below the internal limiting membrane.
 
Kaplan-Meier graph, showing that patients with retinal neovascularization above the internal limiting membrane present significantly slower regression of the neovascularization after panretinal photocoagulation in comparison with those having the neovascularization below the internal limiting membrane.

 
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