June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
A Novel Eye Drop Application Monitor to Assess Patient Compliance Relative to the Shape of Eye Drop Bottles Following Cataract Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mia Allen
    Konowal Vision Center, Estero, FL
  • Ariana Allen
    Konowal Vision Center, Estero, FL
  • Alexandra konowal
    Konowal Vision Center, Estero, FL
  • Gabriel M Gordon
    Retina Health Center, Fort Myers, FL
  • Alexander M Eaton
    Retina Health Center, Fort Myers, FL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Mia Allen, None; Ariana Allen, None; Alexandra konowal, None; Gabriel Gordon, None; Alexander Eaton, Retina Health Center (I), Retina Health Center (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 1919. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Mia Allen, Ariana Allen, Alexandra konowal, Gabriel M Gordon, Alexander M Eaton; A Novel Eye Drop Application Monitor to Assess Patient Compliance Relative to the Shape of Eye Drop Bottles Following Cataract Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):1919.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate patient compliance with prescribed eye drop in relation to bottle shape using a novel eye drop application monitor (EDAM). We hypothesize that subjects will dispense the correct amount of medication more often when using rounded bottles compared to flat bottles.

Methods: Thirty eight subjects were instructed on use of the EDAM. The EDAM device was used for one week with post-operative eye drop applications following cataract surgery using two round bottles and one flat bottle. Patients recorded a compliance log of how many drops were dispensed, how many landed in the eye, outside the eye, or half in and half out. The EDAM was returned for video analysis to objectively determine the patient’s eye drop use and delivery. Variation between subjects’ perceived and actual drops dispensed and perceived and actual drops in was assessed for each bottle type, and the two bottle shapes to each other.

Results: The subject’s perceived drops dispensed were significantly different than the actual drops dispensed for both bottle shapes, varying from the prescribed regimen on average by 39% (p<0.001) with a range of 0%-286% for the round bottle and 32% (P<0.001) with a range of 0-129% for the flat bottle. There was a 41% difference between the actual number of drops the patients dispensed and the prescribed regimen (P<0.001) with a range of 0-282% for the round bottle and 38% with a range of 0-100% for the flat bottle. The subject’s perceived drops in were significantly different than the actual drops in for both bottle shapes, varying from the prescribed regimen by 23% (0%-129%, p<0.001) for the round bottle and 27% (o%-129%, p<0.001) for the flat bottles. The subjects drops in varied from the prescribed regimen by 37% (0%-96% and 0%-100%, p<0.001 for both) of their drops in for both bottle shapes. Neither the perceived nor the actual difference in drops dispensed (p=0.56 and 0.79, respectively) and drops in (p=0.6 and 0.96, respectively) between the round and flat bottle types was significantly different.

Conclusions: While we found no significant difference between the two bottle shapes with respect to drops dispensed or drops in, subjects using the round bottle tended to vary more from the prescribed regimen, contrary to our hypothesis.

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