June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Identifying Diabetic Eye Disease: Comparison of Clinical Examination by Ophthalmologists to Automated Detection from Retinal Color Images
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maureen G Maguire
    Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
  • Ebenezer Daniel
    Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
  • Meindert Niemeijer
    IDx LLC, Iowa City, IA
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Maxwell Pistilli
    Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
  • James C Folk
    IDx LLC, Iowa City, IA
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Michael David Abramoff
    IDx LLC, Iowa City, IA
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Maureen Maguire, IDx LLC (F); Ebenezer Daniel, IDx LLC (F); Meindert Niemeijer, University of Iowa (P), University of Iowa (P); Maxwell Pistilli, IDx LLC (F); James Folk, IDx LLC (I), IDx LLC (I); Michael Abramoff, IDx LLC (C), IDX LLC (I), University of Iowa (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 2014. doi:
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      Maureen G Maguire, Ebenezer Daniel, Meindert Niemeijer, Maxwell Pistilli, James C Folk, Michael David Abramoff; Identifying Diabetic Eye Disease: Comparison of Clinical Examination by Ophthalmologists to Automated Detection from Retinal Color Images. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):2014.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To compare the sensitivity and specificity of the IDx-DR photographic device to clinical examination by ophthalmologists to identify diabetic eye disease (DED).

 
Methods
 

Patients (n=528) were recruited through five ophthalmologic centers at seven sites [general ophthalmology or retinal specialist]. Eligibility criteria included a diagnosis of diabetes; age ≥18 years; no history of other ocular diseases affecting the retina or optic nerve. Ophthalmologists performed a dilated fundus examination including stereoscopic biomicroscopy. Two, 45°, color photographs of each eye were taken with a Topcon NW 200 non-mydriatic camera. Images were processed by the IDx-DR v1.0 device and graded at a central reading center by readers masked to results of the clinical examination and the device. DED was defined as more than mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy as detected by the Reading Center (>= ETDRS level 35) or macular edema within one disc diameter from the fovea as detected by either the Reading Center or the ophthalmologist; if images were not gradeable by the Reading Center (37 [3.5%] eyes), the findings of the ophthalmologist were used for classification of DED. Patients were classified based on the worse gradings of the 2 eyes.

 
Results
 

Prevalence of DED was 38.1% (201/528). Sensitivity was 86.1% (173/201) for the device compared to 53.7% (108/201) for clinical examination; the difference was 32.3% (95% CI: 24.9% to 39.3%). Specificity was 68.5% (224/327) for the device compared to 99.1% (324/327) for clinical examination; the difference was -30.6% (95% CI: -35.8% to -25.7%). When DED was restricted to potentially treatable disease (severe nonproliferative or proliferative retinopathy or macular edema), sensitivity was 96.8% (61/63) for the device compared to 95.2% (60/63) for clinical examination; the difference was 1.6% (95% CI: -6.8% to 10.3%). Differences were similar for different racial and ethnic groups.

 
Conclusions
 

The IDx-DR device detected a higher proportion of people with DED than clinical examination. The device was comparable to clinical examination in detecting potentially treatable disease. Combined with fundus photography, devices such as the the IDx-DR have the potential to improve the accessibility of screening in people with diabetes.

 
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