June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Higher red cell distribution width (RDW) values are associated with worse vision in retinal vein occlusion
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • AHMET OZKOK
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Akash Gupta
    Medical Student, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Laurie Conrad
    Medical Student, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Brooke L W Nesmith
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Shlomit Schaal
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships AHMET OZKOK, None; Akash Gupta, None; Laurie Conrad, None; Brooke Nesmith, None; Shlomit Schaal, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 2032. doi:
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      AHMET OZKOK, Akash Gupta, Laurie Conrad, Brooke L W Nesmith, Shlomit Schaal; Higher red cell distribution width (RDW) values are associated with worse vision in retinal vein occlusion. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):2032.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Red cell distribution width (RDW) is a parameter that measures variation in red blood cell size or red blood cell volume and is an index of heterogeneity of the erythrocytes. Clinical studies revealed that RDW may be a useful diagnostic or prognostic factor for a variety of cardiovascular and thromboembolic diseases, however, there is no data regarding the pathogenic or prognostic significance of RDW in retinal vein occlusion (RVO). The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of RDW in patients with RVO.

 
Methods
 

The study included 126 patients with either branch RVO (70) or central RVO (56) and 67 age and gender matched controls. Comprehensive ophthalmological examination including fundus fluorescein angiography (FA), and macular optical coherence tomography (OCT, Heidelberg Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) was performed on all subjects. Exclusion criteria were RVO not confirmed by FA, history of malignancy, anemia, less than 6 months follow-up duration, and unavailability of RDW value within the 3 months of first presentation of RVO. RVO patients were divided into 4 quartiles according to RDW value: quartile 1 (RDW≤13.8%), quartile 2 (13.8%16.0%). Unpaired samples t-test, Pearson correlation test, chi-square test, ANOVA test and multiple regression analysis were used for statistical evaluation.

 
Results
 

There was no significant difference in the demographics of study subjects in all 3 groups with respect to age, gender, and associated systemic diseases. RDW value was significantly higher in RVO patients (14.9 ± 1.6) compared to control subjects (12.5 ± 1.4; p<0.0001). There was a statistically significant correlation between RDW value and both initial (r= 0.443, p<0.0001) and final Log MAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (r=0.379, p<0.0001) in RVO patients (Figure 1). Both initial and final visual acuities were better in RDW quartiles 1 and 2 compared to RDW quartiles 3 and 4 (Figure 2).

 
Conclusions
 

RDW value was significantly higher in RVO patients compared to the control group. Furthermore, higher RDW value was associated with lower initial and final BCVA. RDW value may be used as a prognostic factor for vision in RVO patients.  

 

 
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