June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Fabrication of cornea-mimetic, cyclodextrin-collagen based biomaterials for corneal transplantation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shoumyo Majumdar
    Translational Tissue Engineering Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,, Baltimore, MD
  • Qiongyu Guo
    Translational Tissue Engineering Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,, Baltimore, MD
  • Anirudha Singh
    Translational Tissue Engineering Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,, Baltimore, MD
  • Oliver D Schein
    Department of Ophthalmology, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Morgana Trexler
    Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD
  • Jennifer Elisseeff
    Translational Tissue Engineering Center, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine,, Baltimore, MD
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Shoumyo Majumdar, None; Qiongyu Guo, None; Anirudha Singh, None; Oliver Schein, None; Morgana Trexler, None; Jennifer Elisseeff, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 2044. doi:
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      Shoumyo Majumdar, Qiongyu Guo, Anirudha Singh, Oliver D Schein, Morgana Trexler, Jennifer Elisseeff; Fabrication of cornea-mimetic, cyclodextrin-collagen based biomaterials for corneal transplantation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):2044.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

We have developed and characterized collagen I based biomimetic ‘vitrigel’ biomaterials that exhibit properties of high transparency, suturability and collagen fibril alignment for application as a regenerative membrane for corneal repair. We utilized the effect of interactions between collagen and cyclodextrins (CD), a family of cyclic oligosachharides, in order to maintain transparency at high thicknesses. Following this, we have also tested a number of functionalized cyclodextrins, to assess the modulation of structural properties in the vitrigel membranes.

 
Methods
 

Vitrigels were prepared as previously described (Biomaterials 33 (2012) 8286-95) with minor modifications to incorporate cyclodextrins (alpha-, beta-, and gamma- cyclodextrins). In addition, vitrigels with modified CDs with different functional groups including methyl, thiol, carboxylic acid, phosphate, were also evaluated. Light transmission of the membranes was measured in a Synergy 2 microplate reader (Biotek). Vitrigel samples were processed for TEM and stained with uranyl acetate and images were taken with a Philips CM120 TEM.

 
Results
 

CD-incorporated collagen (CD-Col) vitrigel membranes exhibited high degrees of transparency. Light transmission (Figure 1) varied between types of CD incorporated; these values were significantly higher than vitrigels without CD. In TEM images (Figure 2B), some functionalized CD-Col vitrigels demonstrate unique self-assembly properties, wherein a lamellar ultrastructure with aligned collagen, similar to native cornea, is obtained. This effect is also be observed in macro-scale, as the lamellae can be carefully separated.

 
Conclusions
 

Functionalized cyclodextrins demonstrate the ability to organize collagen fibrils, allowing higher order self-assembly. This phenomenon further justifies the increased transparency seen in CD-Col membranes. In addition, this study highlights the influence of small molecule interactions with collagen during fibril formation, and illustrates the importance of functionalized CD-Col membranes as potential corneal transplant materials.  

 
Fig 1: Light transmission spectrum. CD-Col membranes demonstrated much higher transparency than collagen membranes without CD. Membrane thickness: 200 microns.
 
Fig 1: Light transmission spectrum. CD-Col membranes demonstrated much higher transparency than collagen membranes without CD. Membrane thickness: 200 microns.
 
 
Fig 2: A) Lamellar structures can be carefully separated in macro-structure B) TEM image of functionalized CD-collagen demonstrating cornea-mimetic lamellae. Scale Bar: 500 nm
 
Fig 2: A) Lamellar structures can be carefully separated in macro-structure B) TEM image of functionalized CD-collagen demonstrating cornea-mimetic lamellae. Scale Bar: 500 nm

 
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