June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
VEGF expression in macrophages does not affect hypoxia induced neovascularization
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christina Nuernberg
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Norbert Kociok
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Claudia Brockmann
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Olaf Strauss
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Ria Baumgrass
    German Rheumatism Research Center, a Leibniz Institute, Berlin, Germany
  • Timo Lischke
    German Rheumatism Research Center, a Leibniz Institute, Berlin, Germany
  • Sandra Beer-Hammer
    Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapy, Eberhard-Karls-University, Tübingen, Germany
  • Antonia M Joussen
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medicine Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Christina Nuernberg, None; Norbert Kociok, None; Claudia Brockmann, None; Olaf Strauss, None; Ria Baumgrass, None; Timo Lischke, None; Sandra Beer-Hammer, None; Antonia Joussen, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 2307. doi:
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      Christina Nuernberg, Norbert Kociok, Claudia Brockmann, Olaf Strauss, Ria Baumgrass, Timo Lischke, Sandra Beer-Hammer, Antonia M Joussen; VEGF expression in macrophages does not affect hypoxia induced neovascularization. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):2307.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Inflammation plays an important role in pathological retinal vascularization: previous studies showed that depletion of macrophages can reduce VEGF levels in the growing retina. We investigated the prevalent hypothesis that VEGF secreted by macrophages and granulocytes affects retinal vascularization.

Methods: VEGF fl/fl LysMCre +/- mice, which selectively lack VEGF expression in macrophages and granulocytes, and their respective controls were used for the experiments. To induce angiogenesis in the retina, we implemented the established mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy. Investigative time points were chosen to be p14 and p17.<br /> Whole flatmounts of the conditional and control littermate mice retinas were dissected and stained with an endothelial-specific (anti-Isolectin IB4) and an anti-CD11b myeloid-specific cell marker. We imaged the flatmounts to quantify and correlate the proliferation of new vessels both in oxygen-treated mice and their controls kept under normal housing conditions. mRNA levels of VEGF and Cre in the retina and the respective control organs were analyzed by Quantitative Real Time PCR. Quantification of the number of macrophages and granulocytes after oxygen treatment compared to untreated control mice in the retina was assessed by FACS-analysis.

Results: Quantification of the avascular area showed no significant differences between control and VEGF fl/fl LysMCre +/- mice after oxygen exposure. Likewise, there was no significant difference in VEGF or Cre expression in the retina of oxygen-treated control and LysMCre fl/fl Cre +/- mice when compared to the respective control mice kept under housing conditions.<br /> The FACS analysis of the retina showed a significantly higher number of inflammatory cells on p14 compared to p17.

Conclusions: Our data show that VEGF derived from macrophages and granulocytes does not affect the formation of pathological blood vessels in this oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model. We conclude that VEGF expression by macrophages and granulocytes does not play a significant role in the pathogenesis of oxygen-induced retinopathy. Though macrophages do not contribute to angiogenesis through direct expression of VEGF, they may control the VEGF level in the retina through interactions with other players, e.g. Mueller cells.

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