June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Evaluation of visual field changes of high myopic eyes in a Chinese population at northwestern China.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yanming Chen
    Department of Ophthalmology, China Medical University, Shenyang, China
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Ji Liu
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Yining Shi
    Department of Ophthalmology, Shaanxi Provincial Hospital, Xi'an, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Yanming Chen, None; Ji Liu, None; Yining Shi, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 2952. doi:
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      Yanming Chen, Ji Liu, Yining Shi; Evaluation of visual field changes of high myopic eyes in a Chinese population at northwestern China.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):2952.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To determine visual field features of high myopic eyes with different levels of refractive errors in a Chinese population.

 
Methods
 

This retrospective comparative study included 452 eyes with high myopia (>-6D) and 108 emmetropic eyes (+0.5 to -0.5D). Eyes with abnormalities other than myopic retinal changes were excluded. Eyes with high myopia were further categorized into three subgroups based on the spherical equivalents (SE) of refractive errors: -6D to -10D (group 1, n=238), -10D to -15D (group 2, n=124) and >-15D (group 3, n=90). Central 30 degree visual field was tested by automatic perimeter Octopus 101 with Low vision central (LVC) program. Outcome were assessed by mean sensitivity (MS) and average number of defects of the visual field. The data were analyzed by t-test for high myopic and normal eye comparison, and Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s test for comparison between subgroups.

 
Results
 

The MS of high myopic eyes was significantly reduced comparing to emmetropic eyes (27.96±5.38 vs 34.05±2.29 dB, P<0.001). The MS in subgroup 1, 2 and 3 were 29.33±5.35dB, 27.57±4.50 dB and 24.84±5.22 dB, respectively (P<0.001; Tukey’s test p<0.05 between each two groups). The average number of defects was 0.88±3.42 in high myopia group and 0.04±0.39 in emmetropia group (P<0.001). While not statistically significant, subgroup showed a trend of increased average number of defects with increased myopia (group 1: 0.79±3.43, group 2: 0.80±3.36, group 3: 1.21±3.50; P=0.584).<br /> Of 85 eyes in the high myopia group younger than 20 years old, 19 eyes (22%) demonstrated temporal enlargement of blind spot, which was not correspondent to the myopic temporal crescent (Fig. 1, 2). Their bio-parameters were significantly different from rest of the eyes in the same age group, including visual acuity (0.39±0.27 vs 0.87±0.3, P<0.05), SE (-15.54±2.98D vs -7.74±3.07D, P<0.05), and axial length (29.8±1.8mm vs 26.73±1.28mm, P<0.05).

 
Conclusions
 

The results of this study suggested high myopic eyes had decreased central visual field qualities. The central 30 degree visual field sensitivity declined as the refractive error increased. An unusual visual field pattern with temporal enlargement of the blind spot was found in a subgroup of younger high myopes and associated with higher refractive errors. This pattern may indicate early impairment of retina nasal to the optic nerve in extremely high myopic eyes.  

 

 
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