June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Study of riboflavin intracorneal penetration aided by Biological assisted Laser Printing (BioLP) for optimized and customized corneal collagen crosslinking in ectatic corneal diseases
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Antoine Robinet
    Ophthalmology, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France
    BioTis INSERM U1026, Bordeaux, France
  • Nataliia Beztsinna
    ARNA INSERM U869, Bordeaux, France
  • Fabien Guillemot
    BioTis INSERM U1026, Bordeaux, France
  • David Touboul
    Ophthalmology, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France
  • Joy Tellouck
    Ophthalmology, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France
  • Murielle Remy
    BioTis INSERM U1026, Bordeaux, France
  • Isabelle Bestel
    ARNA INSERM U869, Bordeaux, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Antoine Robinet, None; Nataliia Beztsinna, None; Fabien Guillemot, Poietis (P); David Touboul, None; Joy Tellouck, None; Murielle Remy, None; Isabelle Bestel, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3006. doi:
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      Antoine Robinet, Nataliia Beztsinna, Fabien Guillemot, David Touboul, Joy Tellouck, Murielle Remy, Isabelle Bestel, ; Study of riboflavin intracorneal penetration aided by Biological assisted Laser Printing (BioLP) for optimized and customized corneal collagen crosslinking in ectatic corneal diseases. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3006.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

<br /> To assess the utility of an emerging technology : the Biological assisted Laser Printing (BioLP) using Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) for optimization and customization of epi-on corneal collagen crosslinking in progressive keratoconus patients.

 
Methods
 

<br /> 17 riboflavin bioinks were formulated for a specific use on the laser platform. The rheological parameters, the quality of spreading in the cartridge, and the velocity regime in the laser platform were estimated for all the riboflavin solutions. The fastest and most wettable riboflavin bioink was selected and tested in the bioprinting device to perform some ultrafast riboflavin ejections toward collagen-based scaffolds, filmed in time-resolved imaging and analysed in fluorescence microscopy, then toward epi-on porcine corneal explants mounted on artificial anterior chambers, examined with slit lamp and confocal microscopy (HRT II, Heidelberg, Germany) before and after the procedure.

 
Results
 

<br /> A bioink chosen for its good wettability and critical velocity of 227 m/s allowed the riboflavin jet to penetrate into the collagen-based scaffolds and to soak it. Although three first attempts performed on porcine corneas did not confirm these results, high resolution on-demand riboflavin patterns were successfully printed on porcine corneal explants.

 
Conclusions
 

<br /> Bioprinting assisted by laser is a promising technology that offers many medical applications. Ultrafast riboflavin jets on collagenic model were performed successfully with the BioLP technology. Future improvements of the machine-cornea interface should allow a preclinical confirmation of these results in a near future.  

 
Figure 1. a: Time-resolved imaging of a laser assisted riboflavin projection into a collagen-based scaffold; b: Fluorescence of a collagenic target soaked with riboflavin after laser assisted printing (fluorescence microscopy).
 
Figure 1. a: Time-resolved imaging of a laser assisted riboflavin projection into a collagen-based scaffold; b: Fluorescence of a collagenic target soaked with riboflavin after laser assisted printing (fluorescence microscopy).
 
 
Figure 2: Slit lamp photography of a riboflavin pattern (ring) printed by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer on a porcine corneal explant mounted on an artificial anterior chamber.
 
Figure 2: Slit lamp photography of a riboflavin pattern (ring) printed by Laser-Induced Forward Transfer on a porcine corneal explant mounted on an artificial anterior chamber.

 
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