June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Corneal infrared thermography and tear meniscus height in dry eye syndrome.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maria L. Merino
    Servicio de Oftalmología, Hospital Marina Baixa, Alicante, Spain
    Clínica Oftalvist, Alicante, Spain
  • Javier Belmonte
    Clínica Oftalvist, Alicante, Spain
    Servicio de Oftalmología, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain
  • Jose Rosas
    Servicio de Reumatología, Hospital Marina Baixa, Alicante, Spain
  • M Carmen Acosta
    Instituto de Neurociencias,UMH-CSIC, San Juan de Alicante, Spain
  • Carlos Belmonte
    Instituto de Neurociencias,UMH-CSIC, San Juan de Alicante, Spain
  • Juana Gallar
    Instituto de Neurociencias,UMH-CSIC, San Juan de Alicante, Spain
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Maria L. Merino, None; Javier Belmonte, None; Jose Rosas, None; M Carmen Acosta, None; Carlos Belmonte, None; Juana Gallar, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 315. doi:
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      Maria L. Merino, Javier Belmonte, Jose Rosas, M Carmen Acosta, Carlos Belmonte, Juana Gallar; Corneal infrared thermography and tear meniscus height in dry eye syndrome.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):315.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To measure corneal surface temperature by infrared thermography and tear meniscus height by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in control subjects and dry eye patients.

Methods: Corneal surface temperature (CST) was measured using an infrared thermal camera (InfRec R300SR, Nippon Avionics) and dedicated software. The temperature value immediately after blink, and the change of temperature and the slope of the temperature decrease during the interblink interval were measured at the center of the cornea. The lower tear meniscus height (TMH) was assessed by anterior segment OCT (HD-Cirrus, Carl Zeiss). McMonnies questionnaire, Schirmer test, tear break-up time (TBUT) and corneal fluorescein staining were also evaluated. All measurements were performed in 18 controls (13 female/5 male; 47±8 years) and 10 patients (8 female/2 male; 50±13 years) already diagnosed of Sjögren’s syndrome (SS).

Results: McMonnies score (p<0.001), Schirmer test (p=0.002), tear break-up time (p<0.001) and corneal fluorescein staining (p<0.001) were significantly different in control and SS patients. Tear meniscus height was significantly lower in SS (149±53 µm, p=0.015) compared with controls (212±65 µm). Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between TMH and corneal staining score in SS patients (r=-0.791; p=0.006) but not in control subjects (r=0.285; p=0.267). The maximal CST was obtained immediately after blinking and reached similar values in control (34.8±0.6 0C) and SS (34.9±0.5 0C). The slope of CST decrease measured afterwards was slightly faster in SS than in control patients (-0.125±0.050 0C/s vs -0.105±0.048 0C/s).

Conclusions: The results suggests that the combined use of the non-invasive methods corneal thermography and OCT allows to identify dry eye patients based on the objective measurements of the slope of corneal surface temperature decrease after blinking and the tear meniscus height values.

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