June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
ASSESSING THE MICROSTRUCTURES OF THE HUMAN CORNEA USING GABOR-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE MICROSCOPY WITH LARGE FIELD OF VIEW AND HIGH RESOLUTION
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrice Tankam
    The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
    Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
  • Zhiguo HE
    Corneal Graft Biology, Engineering and Imaging Laboratory, EA 2521, SFR143, Faculty of Medicine,, Jean Monnet University, Saint Etienne, France
  • Mara Lanis
    Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
  • Cristina Canavesi
    LighTopTech Corp., West Henrietta, NY
  • Thierry Lepine
    CNRS, Laboratoire Hubert Curien (UMR 5516), Université de Lyon, Saint Etienne, France
  • Holly Butler Hindman
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY
  • David Topham
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Rochester Medical Center, School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY
  • Gilles Thuret
    Corneal Graft Biology, Engineering and Imaging Laboratory, EA 2521, SFR143, Faculty of Medicine,, Jean Monnet University, Saint Etienne, France
  • Philippe Gain
    Corneal Graft Biology, Engineering and Imaging Laboratory, EA 2521, SFR143, Faculty of Medicine,, Jean Monnet University, Saint Etienne, France
  • Jannick Rolland-Thompson
    The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
    Center for Visual Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Patrice Tankam, None; Zhiguo HE, None; Mara Lanis, None; Cristina Canavesi, LighTopTech Corp. (E); Thierry Lepine, None; Holly Hindman, None; David Topham, None; Gilles Thuret, None; Philippe Gain, None; Jannick Rolland-Thompson, LighTopTech Corp. (S)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3164. doi:
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      Patrice Tankam, Zhiguo HE, Mara Lanis, Cristina Canavesi, Thierry Lepine, Holly Butler Hindman, David Topham, Gilles Thuret, Philippe Gain, Jannick Rolland-Thompson; ASSESSING THE MICROSTRUCTURES OF THE HUMAN CORNEA USING GABOR-DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE MICROSCOPY WITH LARGE FIELD OF VIEW AND HIGH RESOLUTION. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3164.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

We propose here to investigate human corneal microstructures using a large field of view and high volumetric-resolution imaging modality, Gabor-Domain Optical Coherence Microscopy (GD-OCM), in order to provide insights into corneal layer functionality and disease mechanisms.

 
Methods
 

We first developed a bioreactor to control the anatomy of human excised corneas. A syringe was used to fill the anterior chamber with a balanced salt solution, thus creating aqueous humor like pressure. The microanatomy of these corneas was then imaged using GD-OCM that combines the high sectioning capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) with the high lateral resolution of confocal microscopy. The system achieved high-contrast imaging with a field of view of 1 x 1 mm2 and volumetric cellular resolution of 2 μm across a thickness of up to 2 mm in tissue. The system fitted on a movable cart and the handheld scanning probe was attached to an articulated arm that may be adjusted to image different locations of the cornea. For real time visualization, we implemented a parallelized Multi-Graphic Processing Units (GPU) architecture to speed up the processing of data. The overall time to 3D visualization, including acquisition that is 1.5 minutes, processing and rendering of a 1000 × 1000 × 400 voxels, was less than 2 minutes compared to 2 hours on a conventional CPU. In this investigation, we focused on imaging the microanatomy of the corneal stroma keratocytes as well as corneal endothelial cells.

 
Results
 

The imaging system produced 3D high resolution of the cornea over a 1 x 1 mm2 field of view as shown in Figure 1. Results showed high contrast images of stroma keratocytes and the distribution of endothelial cells comparable to standard in vivo confocal microscopy.

 
Conclusions
 

We demonstrate, with a new imaging modality, imaging key features of the corneal layers, such as stroma, the Descemet’s membrane, and endothelial cells across a large field of view that itself enables accurate counting of the number of cells. Future work will include correlating the morphology of the cells to their functionality. This research is on the path to provide insights into the mechanism of corneal disease and particularly endothelial cells dysfunction.  

 
Image of corneal microstructures
 
Image of corneal microstructures

 
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