June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
The Occurrence of Lens Tumors in Humans and Other Species and a Perceived Opportunity for Further Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Krishna R Surapaneni
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
  • Paul Owen Phelps
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
  • Bradley Thuro
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
  • Richard R Dubielzig
    Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
  • Daniel M Albert
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, WI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Krishna Surapaneni, None; Paul Phelps, None; Bradley Thuro, None; Richard Dubielzig, None; Daniel Albert, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3410. doi:
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      Krishna R Surapaneni, Paul Owen Phelps, Bradley Thuro, Richard R Dubielzig, Daniel M Albert; The Occurrence of Lens Tumors in Humans and Other Species and a Perceived Opportunity for Further Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3410.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this census was to determine in which species and under what conditions lens tumor occurs using human and veterinary pathological material available to us.

Methods: Material in two major archived collections at the University of Wisconsin medical and veterinary schools were studied for occurrence of lens tumors. A database of material from 1920 to 2014 was included, which was approximately 17500 human eye pathology cases, and 45000 veterinary cases. In addition, cases presented in every major eye pathology society (Verhoeff-Zimmerman, Eastern Ophthalmic Pathology Society, and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Alumni Society) were reviewed. Finally, a careful search of the literature was carried out using variations of the terms “Lens, Crystalline"[Mesh]) AND "Neoplasms"[Majr].

Results: The database search revealed that lens tumors occurred under natural conditions in cats and rabbits. Five percent of feline neoplasms (257/5048) in the veterinary school database were designated a Feline Ocular Post-traumatic Sarcoma (FOPTS), a tumor demonstrated to be of lens epithelial origin. Three similar tumors seen in chronically disease rabbit eyes are suspected because or remarkable similarity to FOPTS. There are three reports of these FOPTS-like tumors rabbits in the literature. All cat and rabbit sarcomas had a history of either ocular trauma or protracted uveitis. Literature search also revealed cases where lens tumors were induced in zebrafish, rainbow trout, hamsters, and mice, by carcinogenic agents (methylcholanthrene, thioacetamide), oncogenic viruses (SV40, HPV-16), and genetic manipulation (bumper, p53). No evidence of lens tumors was found in human pathologic material or extensive literature search.

Conclusions: Following lens capsule rupture a malignant lens tumor can occur in other species, but not in humans. We hypothesize that a genetic mechanism exists which prevents lens tumors in man. We have begun a search for candidate genes in other species involved in tumor formation for subsequent comparison in humans.

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