June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Antheraea mylitta silk films with natural RGD sequence supports corneal cell proliferation: A promising new biomaterial for corneal regeneration.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarbani Hazra
    Veterinary Surgery & Radiology, West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences, Kolkata, India
  • Sushovan Chowdhury
    CSIR-IICB, Kolkata, India
  • RAJDEEP GUHA
    CSIR-IICB, Kolkata, India
  • DEBOKI NASKAR
    IIT-Kharagpur, Kharagpur, India
  • NIRPARAJ PRADHAN
    Veterinary Surgery & Radiology, West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences, Kolkata, India
  • , SUBHAS KUNDU
    IIT-Kharagpur, Kharagpur, India
  • Aditya Konar
    CSIR-IICB, Kolkata, India
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Sarbani Hazra, None; Sushovan Chowdhury, None; RAJDEEP GUHA, None; DEBOKI NASKAR, None; NIRPARAJ PRADHAN, None; , SUBHAS KUNDU, None; Aditya Konar, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3470. doi:
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      Sarbani Hazra, Sushovan Chowdhury, RAJDEEP GUHA, DEBOKI NASKAR, NIRPARAJ PRADHAN, , SUBHAS KUNDU, Aditya Konar; Antheraea mylitta silk films with natural RGD sequence supports corneal cell proliferation: A promising new biomaterial for corneal regeneration.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3470.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Regeneration of damaged cornea is an unmet clinical need and challenge. Much success lies in indentifying scaffolds that support cell growth and differentiation for delivering cells to the cornea. Amniotic membrane, which though well in use has certain clinical limitations. Therefore, as a possible alternative, thin transparent silk fibroin film from nonmulberry silk worm Antheraea mylitta has been exploited due to its natural RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-) sequence for improved cell attachment and growth.

Methods: We cultured rat corneal explants on the film and amniotic membrane and evaluated its ability to support generation of cell sheet. The film was implanted within the corneal stroma to examine its biocompatibility, stability and effect on ocular physiology

Results: The silk scaffolds provided sufficient rigidity for easy handling and were transparent. The scaffolds supported the sprouting, migration, attachment and growth of epithelial cells and keratocytes from the corneal explants; the cells formed cell sheet, preserved their phenotypes and the epithelial cells expressed cytokeratin. The cell growth on the silk films was comparable to that grown on amniotic membrane. The implanted film within the cornea remained transparent, stable and biocompatible. The clinical examination as well as histology showed absence of any inflammatory response or neovascularization. Ultra structure of cornea was preserved. The corneal surface integrity was maintained; tear formation, intraocular pressure and electroretinography of implanted eyes showed no adverse changes

Conclusions: The silk fibroin films from Antheraea mylitta species identify it as promising new biomaterial for use as corneal scaffold

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