June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ali Dirani
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Alexandre Matet
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Alejandra B Daruich
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Parmis Parvin
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • martine elalouf
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Aude Ambresin
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Irmela Mantel
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Francine F Behar-Cohen
    Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Ali Dirani, None; Alexandre Matet, None; Alejandra Daruich, None; Parmis Parvin, None; martine elalouf, None; Aude Ambresin, None; Irmela Mantel, None; Francine Behar-Cohen, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3718. doi:
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To compare risk factors and OCT choroidal characteristics between patients with bilateral and unilateral chronic active CSCR; and between CSCR eyes and healthy fellow eyes.

 
Methods
 

Patients with chronic active CSCR (persistence of subretinal fluid > 3 months) were included in the study. Data collection included: age, sex, duration of disease, past medical history, family history, presumed risk factors for CSCR (Hypertension, stress, corticosteroid use,sleep apnea, depression, smoking, allergy, alcohol use, use of antihistaminics, antihypertensive medications, hormonotherapy). SD-OCT characteristics were quantified: subfoveal , nasal and temporal choroidal thickness, presence of hyperreflective dots in the neuroretina, subretinal space and within the choroid, presence of choroidal vascular wall thickening, and the choroidal vessels area.

 
Results
 

Our study included 76 patients with chronic active CSCR. Active CSCR was bilateral in 44 patients and unilateral in 32 patients. The comparison between patients with unilateral and bilateral CSCR showed no difference in the studied risk factors between the two groups (p>0.05). Eyes in bilateral cases had significantly higher subfoveal choroidal thickness (492±124 um in bilateral cases vs 400±111 um in unilateral cases; p=0.001). The eyes with active chronic CSCR have higher subfoveal choroidal thickness (467.3±127.2 um VS 378.5±105 um, p=0.001) and higher choroidal vessels area (p=0.001) than healthy fellow eyes. We also found that retinal, subretinal and choroidal hyperreflective dots and presence of choroidal vascular wall thickening were more frequent in eyes with active chronic CSCR compared to healthy fellow eyes.

 
Conclusions
 

The demographic characteristics and risk factors profile did not show any difference between patients with unilateral and bilateral chronic active CSCR. Choroidal thickness of active eyes was significantly higher in bilateral cases as compared to unilateral cases. Eyes with active chronic CSCR showed higher choroidal thickness, higher prevalence of hyperreflective dots and vascular wall thickening than fellow inactive eyes. This study shows that not only choroidal thickness is an indicator of CSCR activity, but also other choroidal changes, reinforcing the hypothesis of choroidal involvement in CSCR.

 
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