June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
OUTCOMES OF TREATMENT OF CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION ASSOCIATED WITH CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY WITH INTRAVITREAL ANTIANGIOGENIC AGENTS
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catherine Meyerle
    Retina, Johns Hopkins - Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore, MD
  • Jay Chhablani
    LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
  • Igor Kozak
    King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Francesco Pichi
    San Giuseppe Hospital, Milan, Italy
  • Maria H Berrocal
    University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR
  • Rishi P Singh
    Cole Eye Institute/Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Lihteh Wu
    University of Costa Rica, San Jose, Costa Rica
  • Antonio M B Casella
    Federal University of Londrina, Parana, Brazil
  • Ahmad M Mansour
    American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
  • Fernando Arevalo
    Retina, Johns Hopkins - Wilmer Eye Institute, Baltimore, MD
    King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Catherine Meyerle, None; Jay Chhablani, None; Igor Kozak, None; Francesco Pichi, None; Maria Berrocal, None; Rishi Singh, None; Lihteh Wu, None; Antonio Casella, None; Ahmad Mansour, None; Fernando Arevalo, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3725. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Catherine Meyerle, Jay Chhablani, Igor Kozak, Francesco Pichi, Maria H Berrocal, Rishi P Singh, Lihteh Wu, Antonio M B Casella, Ahmad M Mansour, Fernando Arevalo, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital International Collaborative Retina Study Group; OUTCOMES OF TREATMENT OF CHOROIDAL NEOVASCULARIZATION ASSOCIATED WITH CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY WITH INTRAVITREAL ANTIANGIOGENIC AGENTS. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3725.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To report clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes from the largest case series to date of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC).

 
Methods
 

Retrospective multicenter analysis of 46 eyes of 43 consecutive subjects with CNV associated with CSC was conducted. Collected data included demographic information; history of presenting illness; visual acuity; imaging results and treatment details. Main outcome measures were the proportion of eyes that had improved visual acuity (3 or more lines), stable acuity (within ±1 line), or decreased acuity (3 or more lines) at the final visit as compared with baseline examination. Secondary efficacy outcomes included change in visual acuity at final follow up, number of injections, treatment free interval, and adverse events.

 
Results
 

Mean age was 57.56 years (range 29-79 years). Thirty of the subjects were men and 13 were female. Mean follow up duration was 38.3±58.9 months. Classic CNV was present in 21 eyes (46%), minimally classic in 6 eyes (13%) and occult in 19 eyes (41%). Type 1 CNV occured in 20 eyes (44%), type 2 CNV was present in 25 eyes (54%) and type 3 CNV (2%) was reported for one eye. Thirty-four eyes received intravitreal bevacizumab and 12 received ranibizumab. Eight of these eyes also received aflibercept. More than 3 lines of visual acuity improvement occurred in 12 (26%) eyes, vision was stable (within ±1 line) in 19 (41%) eyes, and more than 3 lines of visual loss was noted in 6 (13%) eyes. Mean change in number of lines was 1.16±3.74. Mean number of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) injections during the follow up was 4.45±4.1. The longest treatment free interval was 8.9±7.5 months. The median treatment free interval was 7.8 months. No systemic or ocular serious adverse events were noted.

 
Conclusions
 

Anti-VEGF intravitreal injections as a primary treatment for CNV secondary to CSC in this large case series was safe and efficacious, without any serious systemic or ocular adverse events.

 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×