June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Stainless steel micro needle for retinal vein cannulation.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Koen Willekens
    Ophthalmology, UZ Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
  • Andy Gijbels
    Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation, KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium
  • emmanuel Vander Poorten
    Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation, KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium
  • Dominiek Reynaerts
    Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation, KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium
  • Peter Stalmans
    Ophthalmology, UZ Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Koen Willekens, None; Andy Gijbels, KULeuven R&D (P); emmanuel Vander Poorten, KULeuven R&D (P); Dominiek Reynaerts, KULeuven R&D (P); Peter Stalmans, None
  • Footnotes
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Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 379. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Koen Willekens, Andy Gijbels, emmanuel Vander Poorten, Dominiek Reynaerts, Peter Stalmans; Stainless steel micro needle for retinal vein cannulation.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):379.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

The current management of retinal vein occlusion consists mainly of treating its complications instead of the cause. Although successful blood clot removal via retinal vein cannulation using glass micropipettes has been reported, such glass design is fragile and implicates significant restrictions in shape. Therefore, a dedicated stainless steel micro needle was developed for retinal vein cannulation.

 
Methods
 

A stainless steel 45° angled micro needle with an outer diameter of 80 µm (approximately 44 Gauge) and a lumen of 35µm was developed. Using perfused chorio-allantoic membrane vessels of fertilized chicken eggs (aged 11 days) this needle was evaluated for puncture and infusion capability proven by visual confirmation of blood washout and bleeding after needle retraction.

 
Results
 

Out of 25 freehanded cannulation attempts, 20 punctures were successfully executed by a junior vitreoretinal surgeon with visual confirmation of blood washout and bleeding after needle retraction. Vessel diameter ranged from 100µm to 250µm. There were no double punctures noted although in one vessel a slit-like injury to its wall was observed. Failure of puncture was related to difficult freehanded alignment and rolling of the vessels. All vessels were cannulated with the same needle that showed no signs of wearing. Perfusion pressures below 30 psi rendered stable infusion flow throughout the experiments.

 
Conclusions
 

Micro vessel puncture and infusion of liquid is possible with this custom-built stainless steel 44 Gauge needle.  

 
CAM vessel cannulation<br /> 1) TOP: vessel puncture<br /> 2) MID: blood washout<br /> 3) BOTTOM: Bleeding after needle retraction
 
CAM vessel cannulation<br /> 1) TOP: vessel puncture<br /> 2) MID: blood washout<br /> 3) BOTTOM: Bleeding after needle retraction

 
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