June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Outcomes of pediatric photorefractive keratectomy for correction of pseudophakic myopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence Tychsen
    Ophthal and Neurobio-Childrens Hosp, Washington Univ School of Medicine, St Louis, MO
  • Nicholas Faron
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • James Hoekel
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Lawrence Tychsen, None; Nicholas Faron, None; James Hoekel, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 3933. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Lawrence Tychsen, Nicholas Faron, James Hoekel; Outcomes of pediatric photorefractive keratectomy for correction of pseudophakic myopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):3933.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: Children who have implantation of a standard, posterior chamber IOL at younger ages commonly develop pseudophakic myopia as axial length increases with growth. As an alternative to IOL exchange surgery, we report here outcomes of PRK in children who had pseudophakic myopia and difficulty wearing spectacles or contact lenses.

Methods: Clinical outcome data were collated prospectively in 7 children (8 eyes). Each child was amblyopic, and had undergone cataract surgery with implantation of a pc IOL. Mean IOL power was 20.83D. The mean age at IOL implantation was 5.76 yrs (range 1-11) and PRK 12.4 yrs (range 7-19). The mean follow-up from the IOL implantation was 11.7yrs.

Results: Pseudophakic refractive error prior to PRK averaged -5.04D (range -2 to -8.25D). 2 years after laser treatment, each child was within ±0.5D of target value. Refractive spherical regression averaged -0.10D/yr. Uncorrected visual acuity improved from an average logMAR 0.9 (20/159) to 0.17 (20/30); best corrected visual acuity improved an average of 0.22 logMAR. 5/7 children treated had a gain in at least one level of binocular fusion; the remaining 2 remained at their preoperative level. No patient developed haze following PRK.

Conclusions: Our preliminary results show excimer laser PRK is an effective means for correcting refractive error and improving uncorrected visual acuity in pseudophakic amblyopic children.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×