June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Scleral Buckle Surgery for Primary Retinal Detachment without Posterior Vitreous Detachment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jila Noori
    Ophthalmology, UPMC, Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • George Trichonas
    Ophthalmology, UPMC, Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Victor A Neamtu
    Ophthalmology, UPMC, Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Andrew W Eller
    Ophthalmology, UPMC, Eye Center, Eye and Ear Institute, Ophthalmology and Visual Science Research Center, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jila Noori, None; George Trichonas, None; Victor Neamtu, None; Andrew Eller, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 5071. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jila Noori, George Trichonas, Victor A Neamtu, Andrew W Eller; Scleral Buckle Surgery for Primary Retinal Detachment without Posterior Vitreous Detachment. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):5071.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To present and analyze the anatomical and functional outcomes for scleral buckling (SB) procedure performed in a group of patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) without posterior vitreous detachment (PVD).

 
Methods
 

A single surgeon (awe) electronic health record search was performed for CPT code 67107 from 2005 through 2014. From a total of 244 charts, 42 patients(43 eyes) were identified as fulfilling the criteria of presenting with a RRD without PVD. In this case series, we reviewed patient demographics, visual outcomes, preoperative clinical retinal findings in both eyes and applied SB techniques in treated eyes.The main outcome measure was single SB surgery success rate.

 
Results
 

The mean age was 29 years (range: 8-51 years).The mean follow up period was17 months, with the range of 3 to 60 months.The mean refractive error was -5.00 D (SE). High Myopia (RE>= -6.00D) was present in18 patients (42.8%) and history of trauma in 10 patients (23.8%). Except in 3 eyes, all had obvious atrophic holes or dialysis (9 eyes).4 cases had bilateral RD.14 fellow eyes underwent prophylactic laser for retinal breaks, lattice degeneration or demarcation of subclinical RRD.<br /> The SB technique most frequently applied was usage of tires and encircling bands. Subretinal fluid drainage was performed in only12 eyes (27.9%). The anatomical success rate after single SB surgery was 90.69%.In 4 failed cases, second suergery with vitrectomy was successful. Complications included a limited subretinal hemorrhage (1) and diplopia (1).

 
Conclusions
 

In spite of an increasing trend toward vitrectomy as the primary surgical procedure for RRD repair, the SB remains a highly effective and valuable surgical technique, with a very few complications. In this study, eyes with RRD without PVD, we showed a 90.69% success rate with SB and 100% with a second surgery.

 
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