June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Retinal arterial and venous wall visualization using nonconfocal split-detector adaptive optics laser scanning ophthalmoscopy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shigeta Arichika
    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  • Akihito Uji
    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  • Nagahisa Yoshimura
    Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Shigeta Arichika, None; Akihito Uji, None; Nagahisa Yoshimura, Canon (C), Canon (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 5302. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Shigeta Arichika, Akihito Uji, Nagahisa Yoshimura; Retinal arterial and venous wall visualization using nonconfocal split-detector adaptive optics laser scanning ophthalmoscopy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):5302.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

As it is well known that Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) is a noninvasive technique enabling direct visualization of photoreceptors and vasculature, we decided to study the vascular wall structure of 3 normal subjects using our novel prototype of nonconfocal split-detector AOSLO system developed by Canon Inc.

 
Methods
 

In our split-detector nonconfocal AOSLO, confocal and 2 split nonconfocal signals were simultaneously recorded. The split-detector signal results from the difference between the intensities of the 2 nonconfocal signals divided by their sum at every pixel. The imaging light wavelength of our AOSLO was 840 nm and its optical resolution was 3 μm. The nonconfocal AOSLO images including split-detector images were acquired for 3 normal subjects (5 eyes; mean age, 35 years). The retinal area scanned was 1.4 × 1.4° and 2.8 × 2.8°, and AOSLO images of the upper largest temporal artery and vein were obtained. The scans were recorded for 3 s per area (frame rate, 32 Hz).

 
Results
 

For all 3 subjects, artery and vein were clearly described.<br /> The average literal arterial and venous wall thickness was 10.8 µm and 4.91 µm for subject A, 8.96 µm and 5.13 µm for subject B, and 11.0 µm and 5.99 µm for subject C, respectively.

 
Conclusions
 

Nonconfocal split-detector AOSLO is a noninvasive technique which enables clear vascular visualization for both arteries and veins. This technique has the potential to identify preclinical or histological microvascular changes. However, further clinical studies are needed to validate our results.  

 
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