June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Open globe injuries requiring pars plana vitrectomy at an urban hospital: retrospective review of 10-year experience.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tian Xia
    Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
  • Alain Michael Bauza
    Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
    Ophthalmology, Boston University, Boston, MA
  • Nishant Soni
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD
  • Marco A Zarbin
    Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
  • Paul D Langer
    Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
  • Neelakshi Bhagat
    Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Tian Xia, None; Alain Bauza, None; Nishant Soni, None; Marco Zarbin, None; Paul Langer, None; Neelakshi Bhagat, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 6041. doi:
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      Tian Xia, Alain Michael Bauza, Nishant Soni, Marco A Zarbin, Paul D Langer, Neelakshi Bhagat; Open globe injuries requiring pars plana vitrectomy at an urban hospital: retrospective review of 10-year experience.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):6041.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To describe the characteristics of open globe injuries (OGIs) requiring pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for posterior segment trauma including epidemiology, presentation, management, outcomes and complications.

 
Methods
 

Retrospective chart review of PPV after OGI presenting to Institute of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ between 2003 and 2012 was conducted. Data was collected on demographics, clinical presentation, and surgical procedures. Main outcome measures are visual acuity (VA), retinal attachment based on fundascopic exam, and additional retinal surgeries. Chi-square analysis and student t-tests were performed with significance of p <0.05.

 
Results
 

One-hundred-twenty eyes (mean age, 39 years; 84% male, 16% female) underwent PPV after OGI. They were divided into three groups: 64 (53%) early RD (within 30 days), 30 (25%) delayed RD (after 30 days) and 26 (22%) no RD patients. Injuries were categorized to penetrating (35%, n=43), rupture (50%, n=60), and penetrating injuries with retained intraocular foreign body (IOFB) (14%, n=17). Injuries in Zone I, II and III were seen in 35% (n=40), 34% (n=38) and 31% (n=35), respectively. Ocular trauma scores were statistically significantly different between these groups (p<0.01). Mean presenting and mean final logMAR VA were 2.20± 0.63 and 1.87 ±0.60 respectively (p <0.01) with a mean follow up of 1168 days. Eighty-eight eyes (73%) underwent one PPV, 23 two (19%) PPV, eight three (7%) PPV, and one four (1%) PPV. Final overall anatomic success after surgeries was 98% for early RD, and 95% for delayed RD. Other posterior segment procedures with PPV included scleral buckles (n=13), retinectomy/retinotomy (n=13), and enucleation (n=7).

 
Conclusions
 

Overall functional and anatomic success for eyes with posterior segment trauma that undergo PPV, are poor and comparable to other studies. Delayed presenting RD may have poorer final visual and anatomic success compared to the eyes presenting with early RD. Further studies are needed to analyze these differences.

 
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