June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
A device to model pollen deposition on contact lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kevin van Doorn
    Centre for Contact Lens Research, School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  • Lakshman Subbaraman
    Centre for Contact Lens Research, School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  • Jessie Lemp
    Alcon Laboratories Inc., Fort Worth, TX
  • Cecile A Maissa
    Alcon Laboratories Inc., Fort Worth, TX
  • Lyndon William Jones
    Centre for Contact Lens Research, School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kevin van Doorn, Alcon Laboratories Inc. (F); Lakshman Subbaraman, Alcon Laboratories Inc. (F); Jessie Lemp, Alcon Laboratories Inc. (E); Cecile Maissa, Alcon Laboratories Inc. (E); Lyndon Jones, Alcon Laboratories Inc. (F)
  • Footnotes
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Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 6112. doi:
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      Kevin van Doorn, Lakshman Subbaraman, Jessie Lemp, Cecile A Maissa, Lyndon William Jones; A device to model pollen deposition on contact lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):6112.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Windborne pollen is implicated in seasonal allergies, including ocular symptoms, and pollen adhesion to contact lens (CL) materials may increase direct exposure time and the likelihood that grains will break down and release their allergenic cytoplasmic contents. The purpose of this project was to develop a device for exposing CL materials to windborne pollen and allow quantification of pollen deposition.

 
Methods
 

A small, modular bench top wind tunnel was fashioned and validated. It consists of an enclosed circular tunnel within which CLs can be mounted and through which pollen is carried by adjustable air velocities generated by 2 equidistant fans within the tunnel. Validation of the chamber’s capability to deterministically deposit pollen on lenses was undertaken using 4 pollen species (white pine, common ragweed, Kentucky bluegrass, silver birch) and 7 commercial hydrogel and silicone hydrogel lens types. CLs were tested with and without prior incubation in an artificial tear solution (ATS). Exposures were run for 30 seconds at 5 mph and concentrations from 106-107 grains/m3, depending on pollen type, which simulates an accelerated 13 hour exposure of 640-1200 grains/m3, a range often encountered during allergy season. Exposed CLs were imaged under brightfield or fluorescence microscopy for pollen counting. Analyses were conducted on all lens types pooled together to obtain a global impression of pollen deposition.

 
Results
 

The chamber successfully deposited pollen on CLs and significant differences were found between pollen species in their deposition (p<0.0001). No statistical difference was noted due to ATS incubation (p=0.0924), although there was a trend of reduced deposition (Fig 1).

 
Conclusions
 

The device has proven successful at depositing pollen on CL materials. It may be used to measure the adherence of different species of pollen at varying concentrations and exposure times to any CL material.  

 
Mean number of deposited pollen grains of all species (concentration normalized) on lenses with and without incubation in ATS
 
Mean number of deposited pollen grains of all species (concentration normalized) on lenses with and without incubation in ATS

 
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