June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
A novel method for monitoring corneal surface temperature fluctuation in three dimensions
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yunwei Feng
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  • Paul Murphy
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Yunwei Feng, None; Paul Murphy, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 6115. doi:
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      Yunwei Feng, Paul Murphy; A novel method for monitoring corneal surface temperature fluctuation in three dimensions. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):6115.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To develop a method of quantitatively assessing ocular surface temperature fluctuation (OSTF) in three dimension (time, temperature change and area (percentage)) using dynamic thermal imaging

Methods: A FLIR infrared thermal camera (FLIR SC605, FLIR Systems), with a temperature sensitivity of <0.05°C at 30°C, frame recording frequency of 50Hz and image resolution of 640 x 480 pixels, was used to record human ocular surface temperature (OST) for 9 seconds after a blink in the right eye. The whole cornea surface was selected as the area of interest (AOI) using the FLIR software. Initial OST after a blink was assigned as the baseline. The fluctuation of OST was defined as the change in OST from baseline, and a calculation was done by subtracting the raw temperature data (extracted from the FLIR software output) at baseline from that of each assigned time point after the blink, using custom-designed software. The percentage of the temperature fluctuation in 0.2°C steps at each time point of the AOI was analyzed, colour coded and then animated.

Results: The corneal surface temperature gradually decreased during the 9-second period, with a greatest initial reduction slope over the first second. A decreased temperature was observed, starting at the middle-inferior cornea and spreading peripherally, especially to the temporal cornea, through the 9-second recording period, in this particular participant. The dynamic temperature change pattern was consistent. Subsequent analysis of this output revealed percentage ocular surface area change for a range of temperature fluctuations, which will help to address image analysis challenges from the infrared camera output.

Conclusions: Ocular surface temperature fluctuation could be dynamically monitored in a selected area using FLIR infrared thermal camera and custom software. This technique will facilitate further study of the contribution of OST to tear break-up and ocular surface sensation.

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