June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Management of Negative Dysphotopsia following Cataract Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jewel Sandy
    Ophthalmology, University of Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
  • Tyler Hall
    Alabama Eye and Cataract Center, Birmingham, AL
  • Marc Michelson
    Alabama Eye and Cataract Center, Birmingham, AL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jewel Sandy, None; Tyler Hall, None; Marc Michelson, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 652. doi:
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      Jewel Sandy, Tyler Hall, Marc Michelson; Management of Negative Dysphotopsia following Cataract Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):652.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To evaluate the benefit of various surgical interventions to treat negative dysphotopsia following uncomplicated cataract surgery.

 
Methods
 

Restrospective review of patients with persistent pseudophakic negative dysphotopsia following uncomplicated cataract surgery. Negative dysphotopsia defined as: subjective complaint of dark temporal crescent that persisted for >1 month post-operatively. Patient were treated with either Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser anterior capsulectomy or in-the-bag intraocular lens (IOL) exchange. Primary outcome was partial or complete resolution of negative dysphotopsia symptoms 3 months postoperatively.

 
Results
 

8 patients with negative dysphotopsia had surgical treatment. 3 of 4 patients who had in-the-bag IOL exchange had partial or complete resolution of symptoms by 6 months. 3 of 5 patients who had Nd:YAG laser anterior capsulectomy had partial or complete resolution of symptoms by 3 months.

 
Conclusions
 

Modification of the anterior capsule-IOL relationship is important for the resolution of negative dysphotopsia symtoms. No one treatment method yielded consistent results, suggesting a multifactorial etiology of negative dysphotopsia.  

 
Table 1. Surgical Method and Outcomes.
 
Table 1. Surgical Method and Outcomes.
 
 
Figure 1. Representative color photograph demonstrating after Nd:YAG laser capsulectomy to remove anterior capsule overlying the optic.
 
Figure 1. Representative color photograph demonstrating after Nd:YAG laser capsulectomy to remove anterior capsule overlying the optic.

 
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