June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
The Effect of Storage Conditions on the Anti-Protease Activity of Serum and Plasma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gil Ben-Shlomo
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
  • Haley Mae Roecker
    Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Gil Ben-Shlomo, None; Haley Roecker, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 746. doi:
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      Gil Ben-Shlomo, Haley Mae Roecker; The Effect of Storage Conditions on the Anti-Protease Activity of Serum and Plasma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):746.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the contamination risk and efficacy of canine fresh serum, fresh plasma and frozen plasma against protease activity under different storage conditions, in vitro

Methods: Fresh serum, fresh plasma and frozen plasma were evaluated for their anti-gelatinase and anti-collagenase activity utilizing a commercial gelatinase-collagenase assay. The fresh serum and plasma were prepared immediately after obtaining whole blood from a donor. Plasma from a different donor, that was frozen for 2 years, was obtained from the blood bank of the Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center, Iowa State University. The three compounds were stored at room temperature and at 4oc, and their efficacy was evaluated over 4 and 16 days, respectively. Bacterial and fungal cultures were also taken from these compounds throughout the experiment.

Results: All tested compounds inhibited protease activity with no decline in potency over the study period. For the refrigerated compounds, collagenase inhibition ranged between 39-55% and 50-63% on day 0 and 16 respectively. The gelatinase inhibition ranged between 59-62% and 58-73% on day 0 and 16 respectively. For the non-refrigerated compounds, collagenase inhibition ranged between 39-59% and 46-67% on day 0 and 4 respectively. The gelatinase inhibition ranged between 56-66% and 78-83% on day 0 and 4 respectively. No contaminants were found in the refrigerated compounds throughout the study, however a heavy growth of bacillus subtilis was isolated from the non-refrigerated fresh serum on the third day of the experiment.

Conclusions: Canine fresh serum, fresh plasma and frozen plasma significantly inhibit gelatinase and collagenase activity, in-vitro. The non-refrigerated compounds were at higher risk of contamination compared to the refrigerated compounds. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical significance of these findings.

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