June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Outcomes following treatment of type 1retinopathy of prematurity with bevacizumab versus laser: two year follow up
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maram Isaac
    Ophthalmology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Kamiar Mireskandari
    Ophthalmology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
    University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Nasrin Najm Tehrani
    Ophthalmology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
    University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Maram Isaac, None; Kamiar Mireskandari, None; Nasrin Tehrani, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 985. doi:
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      Maram Isaac, Kamiar Mireskandari, Nasrin Najm Tehrani; Outcomes following treatment of type 1retinopathy of prematurity with bevacizumab versus laser: two year follow up. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):985.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To report refractive, visual acuity and structural outcomes in premature infants treated for type 1 retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) at two years of corrected age (CA) after treatment with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) and compare it to laser.

Methods: This is a retrospective comparative chart review of all infants treated at our institution for ROP between January 2009 and May 2013. We included all infants who were treated with IVB (0.625mg) or with laser photocoagulation for type 1 ROP in zone I or zone II posterior. Outcome measures were refractive errors, visual acuity, and structural outcomes. Data was collected on prevalence and degree of myopia (≥0.25 D) and high myopia (≥ 5.0 D) and reported as spherical equivalent (SE). Visual acuity results were reported in LogMAR. Structural outcomes in accordance with ETROP criteria were collected. Statistical analysis for continuous data was performed using two sample t-tests and Fisher’s exact test was used for categorical data. Repeated measures analysis was performed for visual acuity and spherical equivalent calculations.

Results: Results were available for 12/13 infants (22/23 eyes) in the IVB group and for 12/12 infants (22/22 eyes) in the laser group. Mean corrected age at refraction was 22.95 ± 2.97 months (range 18.75 - 29.75) for IVB and 23.25 ± 2.38 months (range 18.0-26.75) for laser group (p=0.79). Mean SE was -3.61 ± 6.71 (range -16.50 to +8.75) for IVB and -8.27 ± 6.41 (range -19.50 to +0.25) for laser group, (p=0.13). Prevalence of myopia was 68% and 95% in the IVB and laser groups respectively (OR= 0.1, p=0.06). Prevalence of high myopia was 32% and 64% in the IVB and laser groups respectively (OR= 0.30, p=0.15). Mean visual acuity was 0.75 ± 0.4 (range 0.2 to 1.55) and 0.54 ± 0.57 (range 0.1 to 1.99) LogMAR for IVB and laser groups respectively (p=0.30). None of the infants treated with IVB or laser developed a recurrence or unfavorable structural outcome.

Conclusions: At two years of corrected age, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in degree and prevalence of myopia or in visual acuity. We did not observe any unfavorable structural outcomes following treatment with either laser or IVB.

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