March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Effect of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Fine Motor Performance on Simulated Anterior Segment Surgical Skills
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aly R. Sheraly
    Ophthalmology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan
  • David Chin Yee
    Ophthalmology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan
  • David Goldman
    Ophthalmology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Aly R. Sheraly, None; David Chin Yee, None; David Goldman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 77. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Aly R. Sheraly, David Chin Yee, David Goldman; Effect of Acute Sleep Deprivation on Fine Motor Performance on Simulated Anterior Segment Surgical Skills. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):77.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To determine the affect of acute sleep deprivation on fine motor performance in ophthalmology residents using the EYESi ophthalmosurgical simulator to complete various preset simulated surgical tasks.

Methods: : Ophthalmology residents in the Henry Ford Ophthalmology Residency Program volunteered to participate in this study. Each participant completed a survey about their sleep habits and how they perceived it was impacted by overnight call duties. Each participant then completed a series of tasks on the EYESi ophthalmosurgical simulator, first performed at after a full night of sleep and then after participants had less than four hours of sleep. Task scores, timing, errors and economy of motion were automatically recorded for each resident. Statistical analysis on the recorded data using t-tests were performed.

Results: : Based on the completed survey all duty hour requirements were being met. Almost 70 % of residents slept an average of 6-8 hours while not on call. Half of the residents felt being on call reduced the quality of their sleep, while 80% reported decreased quantity of sleep. Performance of three tasks on the EYESi ophthalmosurgical simulator compared performance of residents after a full night of sleep and then after acute sleep deprivation. Each task demonstrated no statistically significant differences in overall score, time to complete the task or economy of motion (p >0.05).

Conclusions: : There is an increasing focus on compliance with residency duty hours to ensure adequate rest to improve overall clinical performance and experience of doctors-in training. This study demonstrates that acute sleep deprivation has a negative affect on the perception of performance amongst residents. Using the simulator after participants underwent acute sleep deprivation did not worsen or improve their performance compared to their baseline performance.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: biostatistics/epidemiology methodology • perception 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×