March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Wound Healing Of Human Corneal Epithelial Cells Impacted By Nanoparticles
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Enhua H. Zhou
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Richard Pizzo
    Department of Physics, Boston Colleague, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Christa Watson
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Joel Cohen
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Quynh Dang
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Georgios Pyrgiotakis
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Joseph D. Brain
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Jeffrey J. Fredberg
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Philip Demokritou
    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Enhua H. Zhou, None; Richard Pizzo, None; Christa Watson, None; Joel Cohen, None; Quynh Dang, None; Georgios Pyrgiotakis, None; Joseph D. Brain, None; Jeffrey J. Fredberg, None; Philip Demokritou, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Pilot Project funding from the HSPH-NIEHS Center for Environmental Health (ES000002) and the Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 495. doi:
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      Enhua H. Zhou, Richard Pizzo, Christa Watson, Joel Cohen, Quynh Dang, Georgios Pyrgiotakis, Joseph D. Brain, Jeffrey J. Fredberg, Philip Demokritou; Wound Healing Of Human Corneal Epithelial Cells Impacted By Nanoparticles. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):495.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : As engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) enter products, workers and consumers are increasingly exposed. Our body’s first line of defense against ENPs is the epithelium. However, there is a lack of understanding of the effects of ENPs on the epithelium of the eye, which is a site of environmental exposure and resulting irritation. Moreover, those effects may be aggravated by preexisting wounds in the epithelium. Here we wanted to explore whether ENPs can impede the healing of a wounded epithelium.

Methods: : To address this question in human corneal epithelial cells (gift from Dr. Ilene K. Gipson), we developed a novel wound healing assay. Using this assay we studied a panel of well characterized, industrially relevant ENPs, including several commercially available ENPs and metals and metal oxides generated using our recently developed Versatile Engineered Nanomaterial Generation System (VENGES).

Results: : TiO2 and SiO2 ENPs did not affect wound healing at doses up to 100 micro g/ml. By contrast, copper oxide, zinc oxide, and silver ENPs substantially impede wound healing in a dose-dependent manner.

Conclusions: : Taken together, these studies provide a novel in-vitro model system for evaluating the physiological impact of nanoparticles in the ocular surface.

Keywords: cornea: epithelium • wound healing 
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