April 2011
Volume 52, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2011
Reticular Macular Disease Is Associated With Primary Multifocal Geographic Atrophy In Age-related Macular Degeneration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicole M. Pumariega
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University Harkness Eye Inst, New York, New York
  • Luna Xu
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University Harkness Eye Inst, New York, New York
  • Anna Blonska
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University Harkness Eye Inst, New York, New York
  • Srilaxmi Bearelly
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University Harkness Eye Inst, New York, New York
  • Roland T. Smith
    Ophthalmology, Columbia University Harkness Eye Inst, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Nicole M. Pumariega, None; Luna Xu, None; Anna Blonska, None; Srilaxmi Bearelly, None; Roland T. Smith, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  The New York Community Trust (New York, NY), National Eye Institute Grant R01 EY015520 (Bethesda, MD), and unrestricted funds from Research to Prevent Blindness (New York, NY)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2011, Vol.52, 105. doi:
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      Nicole M. Pumariega, Luna Xu, Anna Blonska, Srilaxmi Bearelly, Roland T. Smith; Reticular Macular Disease Is Associated With Primary Multifocal Geographic Atrophy In Age-related Macular Degeneration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2011;52(14):105.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To investigate which forms of primary geographic atrophy (GA) co-exist with reticular macular disease (RMD), a sub-phenotype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) defined by the presence of reticular patterns on autofluorescence (AF) and infrared (IR) images.

 
Methods:
 

We retrospectively identified 77 subjects (116 eyes) with primary GA due to AMD and good quality AF and IR images acquired on the Heidelberg HRA/HRA2. We initially classified these eyes into three groups by the configurations of the GA lesions: unilobular GA (one lesion), multilobular GA (two or more distinct lesions), and multilobular-merged GA (two or more lesions coalesced into one, Fig 1). We then determined the incidence of RMD in these groups and the location of the reticular pattern as described in Smith, et al.1

 
Results:
 

The subjects had a mean age of 81.8 years, 71.4% (55/77) of whom were female. Treating the multilobular (65 eyes) and multilobular-merged (41 eyes) as a single multilobular category, 91.4% (106/116) of eyes with primary GA showed multilobular GA, and 8.6% (10/116) of eyes showed central unilobular GA. 98.3% (114/116) of all eyes with primary GA exhibited a reticular pattern, with most (90%) exhibiting reticular IR and/or AF at the superior arcade. Two eyes with unilobular GA had no reticular pattern.

 
Conclusions:
 

Careful examination of AF/IR images suggests that RMD is consistently present in eyes with primary multilobular GA and AMD. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting such a high concordance. The possibility of a common etiology of these sub-phenotypes of AMD warrants further study.1.Smith et al.(2009)AJO;148:733-43.  

 
Keywords: age-related macular degeneration • imaging/image analysis: clinical • retina 
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