March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Collagen Production in Human Corneal Fibroblasts Stimulated by Fibrillar Peptide Amphiphile
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Che J. Connon
    School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, United Kingdom
  • Roanne R. Jones
    School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, United Kingdom
  • Martin Leyland
    Dept. Ophthalmology, Royal Berkshire Hospital Trust, United Kingdom
  • Valeria Castelletto
    School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, United Kingdom
  • James Foster
    School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, United Kingdom
  • Ian W. Hamley*
    School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, United Kingdom
  • Stem Cells and Nanomaterials Laboratory
    School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Che J. Connon, None; Roanne R. Jones, None; Martin Leyland, None; Valeria Castelletto, None; James Foster, None; Ian W. Hamley*, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  BBSRC BB/I008187/1
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 1095. doi:
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      Che J. Connon, Roanne R. Jones, Martin Leyland, Valeria Castelletto, James Foster, Ian W. Hamley*, Stem Cells and Nanomaterials Laboratory; Collagen Production in Human Corneal Fibroblasts Stimulated by Fibrillar Peptide Amphiphile. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):1095.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To measure the effects of a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (C16-KTTS) [1] on human corneal fibroblast collagen production and proliferation

Methods: : Human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) were isolated from donor corneal-rings donated from the Royal Berkshire Hospital and seeded at a density of 1.25 x10^4 per well in the presence of DMEM+10% FBS. Once cells had adhered to the bottom of tissue culture plates, DMEM+10% FBS media was removed and replaced with a serum free media (advanced DMEM+10% ITS+3) containing either 0.002, 0.004 or 0.008 wt% peptide amphiphile (PA) C16-KTTS. This PA is used in anti-wrinkle cosmeceutical applications under the trade name ‘Matrixyl’. HCF grown in the presence of ascorbic acid was used as a positive control and cells grown in serum free media+10% ITS+3 were used a negative control. Following 3 days in culture cell growth and collagen concentration was measured. The structure of the PA was characterised by TEM.

Results: : HCF collagen production increased with the addition of the PA in serum free cell culture medium. There was a significant increase in the production of collagen with 0.002 wt% 0.004 wt% and 0.008 wt%. Cell number also increased linearly with increasing concentration of the PA. Fibrillar structures at high concentrations of PA were observed by TEM. These nano-tapes are based on a bi-layer structure with 5.2nm spacing and lateral stripes with a 4nm periodicity

Conclusions: : PA C16-KTTS significantly increases HCF proliferation and collagen production. Our results support the hypothesis that the fibrillar structure of C16-KTTS that may favour the collagen stimulating nature of this self assembling PA. Therefore peptide amphiphiles may, in the future, play an important role in corneal stroma wound healing.Reference1. Castelletto, V.; Hamley, I. W.; Perez, J.; Abezgauz, L.; Danino, D. Chem. Commun. 2010, 46, 9185-9187.

Keywords: cornea: stroma and keratocytes • proliferation • extracellular matrix 
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