March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Antioxidant Effect of 0.2% Xanthan Gum in Ocular Surface Ephithelial Cells
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carla Amico
    Pharmaco-Biology Unit - BU Pharma, SIFI SPA, Catania, Italy
  • Tatiana Tornetta
    Pharmaco-Biology Unit - BU Pharma, SIFI SPA, Catania, Italy
  • Christian Scifo
    Pharmaco-Biology Unit - BU Pharma, SIFI SPA, Catania, Italy
  • Anna Rita Blanco
    Pharmaco-Biology Unit - BU Pharma, SIFI SPA, Catania, Italy
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Carla Amico, S.I.F.I. S.p.A. (E); Tatiana Tornetta, S.I.F.I. S.p.A. (E); Christian Scifo, S.I.F.I. S.p.A. (E); Anna Rita Blanco, S.I.F.I. S.p.A. (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 2353. doi:
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      Carla Amico, Tatiana Tornetta, Christian Scifo, Anna Rita Blanco; Antioxidant Effect of 0.2% Xanthan Gum in Ocular Surface Ephithelial Cells. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):2353.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

Investigating the potential antioxidant effect of 0.2% xanthan gum (XNT) in comparison with other widely used tear substitutes polymers, such as 0.2% hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), 0.2% hyaluronic acid (HA) and 0.5% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) in human corneal epithelial cells (HCE).

 
Methods:
 

Subconfluent (80%) HCE cultures were treated with the different polysaccharides at the above reported concentrations. The effect of every polymer was investigated with and without the presence of 0.5mM H2O2. In detail, when hydrogen peroxide was added, this injury was performed 1 hour after the addition of polysaccharides. 12 hours later, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (dichlorofluorescein diacetate spectrofluorimetric test) was assessed and their values were normalized versus protein content (BCA protein assay). Morphologic analysis was performed with optical microscopy.

 
Results:
 

No morphological differences in HCE compared to control cells (CTRL, cells treated with the buffer used for polymer solubilisation) were seen with all polymers tested; while, in presence of 0.5mM H2O2, HCE clearly showed signs of cytotoxicity. Polymers protected cultures from oxidative stress with XNT>HA=HEC>CMC, as evidenced by microscopic analysis. These results were confirmed by ROS measurements, which showed XNT as the only polysaccharide to restore, in presence of H2O2, levels of ROS comparable to CTRL (as it is shown in the figure).

 
Conclusions:
 

0.2% xanthan gum was able to protect HCE by oxidative stress, bringing the ROS level down to CTRL values. Considering that, in dry eye syndrome oxidative stress sustains inflammation and apoptotic cell death, the use of xanthan gum in ophthalmic preparations could be beneficial.  

 
Keywords: antioxidants • cornea: epithelium • cornea: tears/tear film/dry eye 
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