March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Protective Effects Of Zeaxanthin On Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Subjected To Methylglyoxal Damage
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas O. Muldoon
    Ophthalmology,
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Richard B. Rosen
    Ophthalmology,
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Dan N. Hu
    Ophthalmology,
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Men Chen
    Pathology,
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Howard Savage
    Pthology,
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Steven A. McCormick
    Pathology,
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Thomas O. Muldoon, None; Richard B. Rosen, None; Dan N. Hu, None; Men Chen, None; Howard Savage, None; Steven A. McCormick, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NYEEI Ophthalmology Chairman’s Research Fund,the Bendheim-Lowenstein Family Retina Center research Fund , New York Eye and Ear Infirmary Pathology Research Fund, New York, NY , and Zeavision LLC.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 2435. doi:
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      Thomas O. Muldoon, Richard B. Rosen, Dan N. Hu, Men Chen, Howard Savage, Steven A. McCormick; Protective Effects Of Zeaxanthin On Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Subjected To Methylglyoxal Damage. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):2435.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Methylglyoxal (MG) is the intermediate product of glycation and is the precursor of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs). MG itself and its metabolic products (AGEs) are toxic to the cells. Excessive accumulation of MG due to aging or hyperglycemia plays a role in the pathogenesis of various ocular diseases, e.g. age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The present study investigated the protective effects of zeaxanthin on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells against MG damage.

Methods: : The toxic effects of MG and the protective effects of zeaxanthin on the cell viability were tested in two human RPE cell lines (ARPE19 and a primary culture of RPE cells from donor eye) using the MTT test. Cells were seeded into 96 well plates. Zeaxanthin was added to the medium at various concentrations. MG (0.3 mM) was added 2 hr later and cultured for another 24 hr. Cells cultured without any additive and cells cultured with MG alone were used as the negative and positive controls, respectively. All groups were tested in triplicate.

Results: : MG at 3 mM caused a decrease of 50 to 59% of cell viability of cultured RPE cells. Pretreatment of zeaxanthin at 10-100 μM significantly protected RPE cells against MG damage. Zeaxanthin at 10, 30 and 100 μM increased the cell viability of RPE cells to 124%, 142% and 152% of cells treated with MG alone in ARPE cells, respectively (P < 0.05 in all groups). Zeaxanthin at 10, 30 and 100 μM increased the cell viability to 120%, 130% and 148% of cells treated with MG alone in primary culture of RPE cells (P < 0.05 in all groups). However, cell viability of cells treated with zeaxanthin and MG was still significantly lower than that in cells not treated with MG (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: : Zeaxanthin at 10-100 μM levels has a partial and significant protective effect on the RPE cells subjected to MG damage in vitro.

Keywords: diabetic retinopathy • macular pigment • aging 
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