March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Relationship Between Scleral Birefringence And Ocular Biometric Parameters Of Healthy Human Eyes In Vivo
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Masahiro Yamanari
    Computational Optics Group,
    University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Satoko Nagase
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Med Univ, Ibaraki Med Ctr, Ami, Inashiki, Japan
  • Shinichi Fukuda
    Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine,
    University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Kotaro Ishii
    Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine,
    University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Tetsuro Oshika
    Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Clinical Medicine,
    University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Masahiro Miura
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Med Univ, Ibaraki Med Ctr, Ami, Inashiki, Japan
  • Yoshiaki Yasuno
    Computational Optics Group,
    University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Masahiro Yamanari, Tomey Corp. (F, P), Topcon Corp. (F); Satoko Nagase, None; Shinichi Fukuda, None; Kotaro Ishii, None; Tetsuro Oshika, Tomey Corp. (F); Masahiro Miura, None; Yoshiaki Yasuno, Tomey Corp. (F, P), Topcon Corp. (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research Grant from Japan Science and Technology Agency
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 2828. doi:
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      Masahiro Yamanari, Satoko Nagase, Shinichi Fukuda, Kotaro Ishii, Tetsuro Oshika, Masahiro Miura, Yoshiaki Yasuno; Relationship Between Scleral Birefringence And Ocular Biometric Parameters Of Healthy Human Eyes In Vivo. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):2828.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

Recent studies have shown that the scleral biomechanics has an important role for the progression of glaucoma, and is related to the structure of collagen fibers in the sclera. Since the birefringence of collagen fiber is sensitive to the density of collagen fibrils and arrangement of collagen fibers, the ultrastructural and biomechanical characteristics of the sclera are closely related to scleral birefringence. In this study, we investigate the birefringence of the sclera at the anterior segment of the human eye in vivo using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) and its relationship to standard ocular biometric parameters, which are known as the risk factors of glaucoma.

 
Methods:
 

Twenty-one left eyes of healthy human subjects without marked disorder were measured. The refractive power and axial eye length were measured with an autokeratorefractometer (RT-7000, Tomey Corp.) and optical biometer (IOL Master, Carl Zeiss Meditec), respectively. The birefringence of the sclera at a region superior to the cornea was measured by a custom-made prototype PS-OCT. Subsequently, the IOP was measured using Goldmann applanation tonometer.

 
Results:
 

Figure 1 (a), (b), and (c) show the plots of birefringence and spherical equivalent, axial eye length, and IOP, respectively. Statistically significant correlation was found between the birefringence and the IOP (two-sided test using Pearson’s correlation coefficient, r = -0.63, p = 0.002). Spherical equivalent and axial eye length did not show statistically significant correlations with the birefringence of the sclera.

 
Conclusions:
 

The scleral birefringence of normal eyes had a negative correlation with the IOP. Considering the structural source of the birefringent tissues, this result would indicate that the sclera of healthy eyes with relatively high IOP had low-dense collagen fibrils or irregular orientations of the collagen fibers.  

 
Keywords: sclera • stress response • imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) 
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