March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Acquired Vitelliform Lesion Associated with Large Drusen
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luiz H. Lima
    Ophthalmology, Federal Unive of Sao Paulo-UNIFESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil
    Vitreous, Retina, Macula Consultants of New York, New York, New York
  • Ketan Laud
    Ophthalmology,
    Vitreous, Retina, Macula Consultants of New York, New York, New York
  • Freund K. Bailey
    Ophthalmology, VItreous, Retina, Macula Consultants of New York, New York, New York
  • Lawrence Yannuzzi,
    Ophthalmology,
    Vitreous, Retina, Macula Consultants of New York, New York, New York
  • Richard F. Spaide
    Vitreous Retina Macula Consultants NY, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Luiz H. Lima, None; Ketan Laud, None; Freund K. Bailey, None; Lawrence Yannuzzi,, None; Richard F. Spaide, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 2905. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Luiz H. Lima, Ketan Laud, Freund K. Bailey, Lawrence Yannuzzi,, Richard F. Spaide; Acquired Vitelliform Lesion Associated with Large Drusen. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):2905.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To describe the association of acquired vitelliform lesion (AVL) and large drusen in patients with non-neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

 
Methods:
 

A retrospective review of clinical examination and multimodal imaging data of patients with AVL and large drusen seen over a 12-month period was performed. AVL was defined as subretinal accretion of yellowish material within the macular region. Large drusen was diagnosed by the presence of mounded deposits in the sub-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) space between the RPE and the Bruch's membrane using multimodal imaging analysis (color photography, autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography)

 
Results:
 

Thirteen eyes of 9 Caucasian patients with a mean age of 74 years were observed to have AVL associated with large drusen. The median visual acuity was 20/60. All AVL's were hyperautofluorescent and were located in the subretinal space between the RPE and the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction. The AVL's in this series had similar color, autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomographic findings as the AVL`s seen in association with cuticular drusen and subretinal drusenoid deposits

 
Conclusions:
 

AVLs, which have previously been related to cuticular drusen and subretinal drusenoid deposits, can occur in association with large drusen. Formation of drusen has been related to a complex interplay between RPE function, lipid transport, and inflammation. Abnormalities leading to drusen formation or processes that function in parallel to these may be causative in AVL formation

 
Keywords: age-related macular degeneration • imaging/image analysis: clinical • drusen 
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