March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
A New Focus on Refraction in the "ROP Rat"
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James D. Akula
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts
    Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Toco Y. Chui
    Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts
    Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
  • David P. Bissig
    Anatomy and Cell Biology,
    Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
  • Bruce A. Berkowitz
    Anatomy and Cell Biology,
    Ophthalmology,
    Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  James D. Akula, None; Toco Y. Chui, None; David P. Bissig, None; Bruce A. Berkowitz, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  JDA: NIH EY020308; BAB: NIH EY018109, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation; DB: NIH AG034752, Wayne State School of Medicine MD/PhD program; Kresge Eye Institute: Research to Prevent Blindness.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 3470. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      James D. Akula, Toco Y. Chui, David P. Bissig, Bruce A. Berkowitz; A New Focus on Refraction in the "ROP Rat". Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):3470.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is clinically characterized by abnormal retinal vessels at the posterior pole of the eye; it is also commonly characterized by vascular abnormalities in the anterior segment, visual dysfunction which is based in retinal dysfunction, and most commonly of all, arrested eye growth and high refractive error, particularly (and paradoxically) myopia. The Penn et al. (1994) "50/10" oxygen-induced retinopathy rat model of ROP mimics the neurovascular features of ROP. We determined whether the "ROP rat" also models the small-eyed myopia characteristic of ROP.

Methods: : We examined magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of albino (Sprague-Dawley) and pigmented (Long-Evans) ROP rat eyes and eyes of age- and strain-matched room-air-reared (RAR) controls. We measured the positions and curvatures of the various optical media so that we could estimate the refractive state of each eye based on Hughes' (1979) model eye for the rat.

Results: : Even in adulthood (postnatal day 50), Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans ROP rats were significantly myopic compared to strain-matched RAR rats. The myopia in the Long-Evans ROP rats was more severe than in the Sprague-Dawley ROP rats, but the latter also had significantly shorter axial lengths.

Conclusions: : We have found the ROP rat to be a novel and potentially informative model for investigation of physiological mechanisms in myopia in general and the myopia peculiar to ROP in particular. We have, furthermore, shown that MRI can serve as a noninvasive method to evaluate the contributions of the various optical media to refractive state in the living eye.

Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity • refractive error development • comparative anatomy 
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