March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
The Role of the Sighting Dominant Eye during Target Saccades
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Isabelle POULAIN
    R & D Optics - Vision Science Department, ESSILOR INTERNATIONAL, Paris, France
  • Gildas MARIN
    R & D Optics - Vision Science Department, ESSILOR INTERNATIONAL, Paris, France
  • Konogan BARANTON
    R & D Optics - Vision Science Department, ESSILOR INTERNATIONAL, Paris, France
  • Damien PAILLE
    R & D Optics - Vision Science Department, ESSILOR INTERNATIONAL, Paris, France
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Isabelle Poulain, Essilor Int. (E); Gildas Marin, Essilor Int. (E); Konogan Baranton, Essilor Int. (E); Damien Paille, Essilor Int. (E)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 4829. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Isabelle POULAIN, Gildas MARIN, Konogan BARANTON, Damien PAILLE; The Role of the Sighting Dominant Eye during Target Saccades. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):4829.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To study the influence of a perturbation of the sighting-dominant eye during a visual task with head movements.

Methods: : 8 subjects were involved in the experiment, 4 right sighting-dominant eye and 4 left (hole in the card test). Acuity dominance was also measured with a standard far vision acuity chart. Subjects had to perform saccades to off-centered targets with disturbing simulated blur. 3 conditions were tested: equal blur of 1D on both eyes and 2 asymmetric blur conditions with an additional blur of 0.75D on one eye. The minimum level of 1D of blur was imposed to induce head movements. 50 targets were positioned every 5° from 20 to 40° horizontally either left and right and between -10 to +10° vertically from the straight ahead gaze direction. Between each peripheral target, the subject had to fixate a central cross target. Targets were randomly rotated Snellen E projected on a stereoscopic display during 1500 ms. The subject task was to indicate the E orientation with a joypad to confirm the target fixation. The time response to the visual stimulus was the time at which the subjects press the joypad once the target was displayed. We recorded head movements thanks to an optical tracking system from A.R.T. (Advanced Realtime Tracking GmbH). Data were analysed in terms of instantaneous head rotation speed. Acceleration and deceleration phases were linearly fitted to define a start and end time for head movement.

Results: : Data were analysed using ANOVA with repeated measurements. The average time response is found to be significantly longer (p<0.05) when the additional blur is on the sighting-dominant eye (respectively 1317ms vs. 1245ms). Head movement is slightly longer when sighting-dominant eye is the most blurred (p<0.1). No significant effect is found neither for time response nor for head movements when analysing against acuity dominance.Moreover, the movement duration increases significantly, starting sooner and ending latter, with the target eccentricity. This behaviour tends to be affected by which eye is the most blurred.

Conclusions: : Our experiment suggests that the sighting-dominant eye plays a prominent role in the time response and head movement profile during recognition task.

Keywords: detection 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×