March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Eye Injuries in the Elderly Presenting to United States Emergency Departments: 2001-2007
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julia G. Kim
    Ophthalmology,
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • James G. Linakis
    Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics,
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • Michael J. Mello
    Emergency Medicine, Community Health,
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • Grayson W. Armstrong
    Ophthalmology,
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
  • Paul B. Greenberg
    Ophthalmology,
    Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island
    Ophthalmology, VA Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Julia G. Kim, None; James G. Linakis, None; Michael J. Mello, None; Grayson W. Armstrong, None; Paul B. Greenberg, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 4977. doi:
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      Julia G. Kim, James G. Linakis, Michael J. Mello, Grayson W. Armstrong, Paul B. Greenberg; Eye Injuries in the Elderly Presenting to United States Emergency Departments: 2001-2007. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):4977.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

To quantify and characterize eye injuries in elderly patients (≥65 years) seen in United States (US) hospital emergency departments (EDs).

 
Methods:
 

Descriptive analysis of eye injuries using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System - All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP), which collects data from sample hospitals and projects national estimates of non-fatal injuries. Data collected included demographic variables, diagnoses, etiology, hospital disposition, locale, and timing of injury (month and day of week) in patients aged 65 and older for 2001 through 2007.

 
Results:
 

There were an estimated 207,489 (95% confidence interval [CI] 168,920 to 246,057) eye injuries in patients aged 65 and older; 116,839 (CI 95,790 to 137,887; 56.3%) visits were by males. The most common diagnosis of injury was contusions/abrasions, which accounted for an estimated 99,419 (CI 80,449 to 118,388; 47.9%) visits. The leading cause for eye injuries was being struck by/against an object (88,719; CI 71,089 to 106,349; 42.8%). Most eye injuries occurred at home (115,974; CI 89,174 to 142,774; 55.9%).

 
Conclusions:
 

This study suggests that most injuries in the elderly occur at home. The most common injuries are contusions or abrasions, and are often caused by being struck by/against an object. Further research is needed on risk factors for eye injuries in the home in order to design appropriate prevention strategies.

 
Keywords: trauma • aging 
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