March 2012
Volume 53, Issue 14
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   March 2012
Epidemiology of Chinese Patients in the Ophthalmology Clinic of a New York City Public Hospital
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sze H. Wong
    Ophthalmology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • Liwu G. Chen
    Ophthalmology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • Christopher C. Teng
    Ophthalmology, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York
    Einhorn Clinical Research Center, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  Sze H. Wong, None; Liwu G. Chen, None; Christopher C. Teng, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 2012, Vol.53, 5641. doi:
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      Sze H. Wong, Liwu G. Chen, Christopher C. Teng; Epidemiology of Chinese Patients in the Ophthalmology Clinic of a New York City Public Hospital. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2012;53(14):5641.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To identify the epidemiological characteristics of ethnic Chinese patients evaluated in the general ophthalmology clinic of Bellevue Hospital Center, a large New York City public hospital.

Methods: : A retrospective chart review was conducted on Chinese patients seen in the general ophthalmology clinic between 2007 and 2011. The patient’s gender, age, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), ocular history, medical history, insurance type, and occupation were recorded.

Results: : 217 patients were evaluated, 112 (52%) were female and 105 (48%) were male. The mean age was 50.6±14.3 years (range 20-88). The mean BCVA was logMAR 0.23 (20/34) OD and 0.08 (20/24) OS. 58 (27%) patients had at least one eye with BCVA worse than 20/40. There were 12 (6%) glaucoma suspects, 4 (2%) narrow angles, 4 (2%) glaucoma (3 open angle, 1 angle closure), 11 (5%) macular edema, 9 (4%) non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, 7 (3%) proliferative diabetic retinopathy, 5 (2%) branched retinal vein occlusion or central retinal vein occlusion, 5 (2%) retinal detachment, 5 (2%) uveitis, 3 (1%) trauma, 2 (1%) choroidal melanoma, 40 (18%) refractive error, 44 (20%) blepharitis, 30 (14%) cataract(s), 19 (9%) other ocular diagnosis, and 17 (8%) normals. 66 (30%) patients had hypertension, 53 (24%) diabetes, 16 (7%) hepatitis B, 6 (3%) HIV, 6 (3%) thyroid disease, 6 (3%) active tuberculosis, 10 (5%) other medical conditions, and 54 (25%) with no medical problems. Payment methods included 116 (53%) self pay on a graduated fee scale, 20 (9%) Medicaid, 20 (9%) HMO Commercial, 16 (7%) MetroPlus, 12 (6%) Medicare, 6 (3%) commercial insurance, 2 (1%) private insurance, and 25 (12%) unknown. The occupations of 20 patients (9%) were known. There were 6 (30%) restaurant workers, 2 (10%) factory workers, 2 (10%) house wives, 2 (10%) students, 2 (10%) teachers, 3 (15%) other blue collar jobs, 2 (10%) retired, and 1 (5%) unemployed. Furthermore, nearly all patients required interpretation due to poor English proficiency.

Conclusions: : A significant proportion of Chinese patients in the general ophthalmology clinic of Bellevue Hospital Center present with serious ocular diseases that result in poor visual outcome. This highlights the importance of educating the public, especially those with low socioeconomic status and the ethnic Chinese population, of the significance of preventative care, regular eye exams, and early treatment and close follow up.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: health care delivery/economics/manpower • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications 
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