April 2009
Volume 50, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2009
Outcome of Sequential Glaucoma Implants in Refractory Glauucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Anand
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
  • C. Tello
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, New York
  • P. Sidoti
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, New York
  • R. Ritch
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, New York
  • J. M. Liebmann
    Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, New York
    Ophthalmology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Anand, None; C. Tello, None; P. Sidoti, None; R. Ritch, None; J.M. Liebmann, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  Edward B. Cohen Research Fund of the New York Glaucoma Research Institute, New York, NY
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2009, Vol.50, 440. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      A. Anand, C. Tello, P. Sidoti, R. Ritch, J. M. Liebmann; Outcome of Sequential Glaucoma Implants in Refractory Glauucoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2009;50(13):440.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate efficacy of a second glaucoma implant in eyes with inadequate IOP control following a primary implant.

Methods: : Medical records of all patients undergoing a second glaucoma implant surgery from 1996 to 2008 were reviewed. Patient demographics, ocular findings, glaucoma medications, and surgical complications were recorded. Success was defined as IOP < 21mm Hg with at least 25% reduction in IOP and no prolonged hypotony (IOP <4mm Hg).

Results: : We enrolled 46 eyes of 43 patients (mean age, 53±23 yrs). Previous surgeries included failed trabeculectomy (43 eyes), cataract surgery (40 eyes) and glaucoma implants in all eyes (Baerveldt, 23 eyes; Ahmed, 14 eyes; Molteno, 6 eyes; Schockett, 2 eyes and Krupin, 1 eye). Mean follow-up following second implant was 32±22 months. Life-table analysis demonstrated success rates of 91%, 87% and 82% at 1, 2 and 3 years, respectively. Mean IOPs (13.1±5.3 vs. 24.8±7.6mm Hg, p<0.001) and number of medications (1.5±1.3 vs. 4.0±1.3, p<0.001) were lower following the second implant. No major intraoperative complications occurred. There was no difference in preoperative and most recent LogMAR visual acuities (0.88 ± 0.14 vs. 1.0±0.15, p=0.08). The most frequently used second implants resulted in similar percentage IOP reduction from preoperative IOP before the second implant (Baerveldt: 46±20%; Ahmed: 40±18%, p=0.3). The most frequently used implant combinations were similar in percentage IOP reduction from IOP before any device implantation (Baerveldt-Ahmed: 55±14%; Ahmed-Baerveldt: 55±18%; Baerveldt-Baerveldt: 53±15%, p=0.9). There was no correlation between total surface area of both implants and percentage IOP reduction from baseline IOP prior to the first tube implant (p=0.3).

Conclusions: : A second glaucoma implant may effectively lower IOP in eyes with refractory glaucoma.

Keywords: clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications • clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: systems/equipment/techniques • clinical research methodology 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×