April 2009
Volume 50, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2009
Collagen Encourages Host Cell Integration Within a Superporous Tissue Engineered Cornea
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Kadakia
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • M. Shafiq
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • A. Namavari
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • R. A. Gemeinhart
    Biopharmaceutical Sciences,
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • M. Cho
    Bioengineering,
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • A. Djalilian
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A. Kadakia, None; M. Shafiq, None; A. Namavari, None; R.A. Gemeinhart, None; M. Cho, None; A. Djalilian, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant EB006067, EBAA, Deiss
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2009, Vol.50, 1511. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A. Kadakia, M. Shafiq, A. Namavari, R. A. Gemeinhart, M. Cho, A. Djalilian; Collagen Encourages Host Cell Integration Within a Superporous Tissue Engineered Cornea. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2009;50(13):1511.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : A limitation of many synthetic artificial corneas is minimal host tissue integration. This can lead to infection, melting, or extrusion. While their skirts are porous to create a pathway for host cell migration, generally these synthetic skirts lack cues to promote cell adhesion. To overcome this, we incorporated collagen within a synthetic (polyethylene glycol diacrylate, PEGDA) superporous hydrogel (SPH). Previously we showed that collagenous SPHs improved cell adhesion, migration, and retention in vitro. We therefore hypothesize that collagen enhanced SPHs will result in improved host cell integration when implanted in vivo.

Methods: : A dehydrated PEGDA based SPH was soaked in a collagen type 1 solution. Collagen gelation in 3-D within the pores, resulted in an interconnected porous hybrid scaffold. Non hybrid scaffolds as controls were created by swelling dehydrated SPHs in cell culture media without collagen. Both types of scaffolds were implanted in rat corneas. The implant was tucked within a stromal pocket for 3 weeks to allow sufficient time for host cell migration and 3-D integration of the implant. At 1, 2, and 3 weeks, implants were removed, sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E).

Results: : Grossly, collagenous SPHs showed a greater inflammatory response and increased angiogenesis compared to noncollagenous SPHs. Microscopically, collagen enhanced scaffolds appeared to have increased cell numbers within the scaffold at earlier time points. There were no infections or extrusions of the implant. More long-term studies are ongoing.

Keywords: cornea: stroma and keratocytes • cornea: basic science • cornea: clinical science 
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