April 2009
Volume 50, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2009
Detecting Glaucomatous Progression Using Scanning Laser Polarimetry With Variable and Enhanced Corneal Compensation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • D. S. Grewal
    Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
  • M. Sehi
    Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
  • D. S. Greenfield
    Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
  • Advanced Imaging in Glaucoma Study Group
    Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  D.S. Grewal, None; M. Sehi, None; D.S. Greenfield, Carl Zeiss Meditec, C.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grants R01-EY08684, RO1-EY013516, Bethesda, Maryland, an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness P30-EY14801, New York, New York.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2009, Vol.50, 2251. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      D. S. Grewal, M. Sehi, D. S. Greenfield, Advanced Imaging in Glaucoma Study Group; Detecting Glaucomatous Progression Using Scanning Laser Polarimetry With Variable and Enhanced Corneal Compensation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2009;50(13):2251.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: : To evaluate the impact of corneal compensation on detection of glaucoma progression using scanning laser polarimetry.

Methods: : Normal, glaucoma suspect and glaucoma patients with 24 months follow-up meeting eligibility criteria were prospectively enrolled. All subjects underwent complete eye exam, SAP, scanning laser polarimetry with variable and enhanced corneal compensation (GDxVCC and GDxECC). Glaucoma progression (GDx-GPA, Carl Zeiss Meditec) was defined as repeatable change on 2 consecutive scans compared with 2 baseline images using any of 3 strategies: ≥150 contiguous pixels on the progression map (method A),≥4 adjacent segments on the TSNIT graph (method B), or significant change in slope of the summary parameters (method C). Abnormal birefringence pattern (ABP) was defined as a TSS ≤60.

Results: : Thirteen normal, 31 suspect, and 29 glaucomatous eyes were included. Progression was identified in 5 eyes using GDxVCC (2 suspect, 3 glaucoma) and 7 eyes using GDxECC (4 suspect, 3 glaucoma). Agreement among progression methods was strongest for method C (kappa=0.7, p<0.001) compared with methods A (kappa=0.3, p=0.03) and B (kappa=-0.04, p=0.7). Mean TSS scores in normal, suspect, and glaucomatous eyes were significantly (p<0.01) higher using GDxECC (97.9±3.8, 98.8± 2.9, 97.8±4.8) compared with VCC (81.8±22.2, 86.8±19.9, 71.8±27.4). Mean TSS values were similar in progressing and non-progressing eyes using VCC (70.7± 29.5, 80.6±23.9, p=0.4) and ECC (99.1±1.5, 98.1±4.0, p=0.5). Eight patients (11%) underwent a change in progression classification (converters) when using GDxECC compared with GDxVCC. Mean GDxVCC TSS scores in converters (78.8± 28.0) and non-converters (80.1± 24.4) were similar (p=0.9). ABP was not associated (r=0.14, p=0.7) with a change in progression classification.

Conclusions: : Longitudinal detection of glaucoma progression using scanning laser polarimetry with variable and enhanced corneal compensation is not interchangeable. Differences in progression detection are not explained by atypical birefringence.

Keywords: image processing • imaging/image analysis: clinical • imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) 
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×