April 2009
Volume 50, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2009
Integration of Ultra-high Frequency Antennas on Contact Lenses: Steps Toward Energy Harvesting and Telecommunication
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • B. A. Parviz
    Electrical Engineering,
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Y.-T. Liao
    Electrical Engineering,
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • A. Lingley
    Electrical Engineering,
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • J. Pandey
    Electrical Engineering,
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • T. Shen
    Ophthalmology,
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • B. Otis
    Electrical Engineering,
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  B.A. Parviz, None; Y.-T. Liao, None; A. Lingley, None; J. Pandey, None; T. Shen, None; B. Otis, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2009, Vol.50, 2414. doi:
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      B. A. Parviz, Y.-T. Liao, A. Lingley, J. Pandey, T. Shen, B. Otis; Integration of Ultra-high Frequency Antennas on Contact Lenses: Steps Toward Energy Harvesting and Telecommunication. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2009;50(13):2414.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : Active contact lenses incorporating electronics, sensors, and optoelectronics provide a unique opportunity for continuously monitoring a person’s health status and dynamically altering the visual field. Such devices must be remotely powered and communicated with. We report the design and construction of GHz-range antennas on contact lenses that can be used for radio frequency energy transmission to and communication with a stand-alone contact lens.

Methods: : We designed and simulated antennas using full-wave electromagnetic software. We microfabricated the antennas on a 100 µm thick polyethylene terephthalate substrate with Cr/Au (50 nm/1 µm) metal lines and encapsulated the structure in 26 µm of photopatternable polymer SU8.

Results: : Fig. 1 shows simulation and measurement results for reflection loss of the 6 GHz antenna. Fig. 2 is an image of the fabricated antenna. Simulations were back-annotated using initial measurement results to create an accurate model. A path loss of 40 dB was measured with a transmitter/receiver spacing of 5".

Keywords: contact lens • vision and action 
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