April 2009
Volume 50, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2009
The Relationship Between Lighting and Clinical Measures of Visual Function at Home and in the Clinic in Normal and Glaucoma Participants
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. M. Bhorade
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri
  • M. S. Perlmutter
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri
  • S. T. Chang
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri
  • M. Pekmezci
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Of California, San Francisco, California
  • B. S. Wilson
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri
  • J. D. Kambarian
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri
  • M. O. Gordon
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  A.M. Bhorade, Pfizer, F; M.S. Perlmutter, None; S.T. Chang, None; M. Pekmezci, None; B.S. Wilson, None; J.D. Kambarian, None; M.O. Gordon, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH EYO17616-03, Pfizer, American Glaucoma Society, Washington University Center for Aging
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2009, Vol.50, 3776. doi:
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      A. M. Bhorade, M. S. Perlmutter, S. T. Chang, M. Pekmezci, B. S. Wilson, J. D. Kambarian, M. O. Gordon; The Relationship Between Lighting and Clinical Measures of Visual Function at Home and in the Clinic in Normal and Glaucoma Participants. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2009;50(13):3776.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine whether lighting and clinical measures of visual function differ between the home and clinic setting in normal and glaucoma participants.

Methods: : Consecutive eligible patients with glaucoma and age and gender matched normal patients were enrolled in the study. Participants completed a home and clinic visit randomized with respect to order of completion. Certified examiners administered the ETDRS distance visual acuity, Lighthouse near visual acuity, Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity, and Brightness Acuity Tester (low and medium settings) at each visit. Illumination of each chart was measured with a light meter at the home and clinic visits. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare home and clinic illumination and clinical measures of visual function.

Results: : 103 glaucoma participants with a mean age of 73.0 ± 8.0 years and 26 normal participants with a mean age of 74.4 ± 6.4 years completed both a home and clinic visit. Illumination and performance on all clinical measures were significantly higher in the clinic than in the home in both groups (p<0.05, Wilcoxon rank sum test).

Conclusions: : Performance on clinical measures of visual function was better in the clinic than in the home in both glaucoma and normal participants. Illumination was substantially higher in the clinic than in the home. Clinicians should be aware that clinical measures tested in the clinic may not accurately reflect visual function of patients in their home setting. An improvement in home lighting may improve visual function of older glaucoma and normal patients.

Keywords: brightness and lightness • aging: visual performance • quality of life 
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