April 2009
Volume 50, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2009
Comparison of the Power, Diameter and Optomechanical Response of Lenses From Indian and American Eye-Banks
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Taneja
    LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
    Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, Australia
  • F. Manns
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Univ. of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, Miami, Florida
    Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Univ. of Miami College of Engineering,, Coral Gables, Florida
  • P. Vaddavalli
    LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
    Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, Australia
  • V. Pesala
    LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
  • D. Nankivil
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Univ. of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, Miami, Florida
    Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Univ. of Miami College of Engineering,, Coral Gables, Florida
  • A. Mohamed
    LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
  • D. Borja
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Univ. of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, Miami, Florida
    Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Univ. of Miami College of Engineering,, Coral Gables, Florida
  • V. Sangwan
    LV Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India
    Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, Australia
  • A. Ho
    Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, Australia
    Institute for Eye Research, Sydney, Australia
  • J.-M. Parel
    Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, Australia
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Univ. of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, Miami, Florida
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  M. Taneja, None; F. Manns, None; P. Vaddavalli, None; V. Pesala, None; D. Nankivil, None; A. Mohamed, None; D. Borja, None; V. Sangwan, None; A. Ho, None; J.-M. Parel, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH EY14225; Australian Federal Government CRC Scheme through the Vision Cooperative Research Centre; Florida Lions Eye Bank; Dr Rakhi Jain , AMO Inc, Santa Ana, CA; NIH center grant P30-EY014801; Res
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2009, Vol.50, 6135. doi:
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      M. Taneja, F. Manns, P. Vaddavalli, V. Pesala, D. Nankivil, A. Mohamed, D. Borja, V. Sangwan, A. Ho, J.-M. Parel; Comparison of the Power, Diameter and Optomechanical Response of Lenses From Indian and American Eye-Banks. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2009;50(13):6135.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : To determine if there are differences in optomechanical properties of human crystalline lenses from Indian and American Eye-Banks which may affect the lens response during simulated accommodation in a lens stretcher.

Methods: : Lens stretching was performed on tissue obtained from the LV Prasad Eye Institute Eye-Bank (n=28, Age=1 day to 54 years, PMT=24 to 79 hrs) in India and from several Eye Banks in the United States (n=56, Age =1 to 85 years, PMT=24 to 120 hrs). The eyes were dissected according to a protocol described previously (Parel et al, ARVO 2002) to produce specimens that contain the lens maintained in its accommodating framework, including the zonules, ciliary body and a band of sclera. The specimens were mounted in a lens stretching system (EVAS I) which simulates accommodation by stretching the outer sclera in 8 radial increments of 0.25 mm. The load, lens equatorial diameter, ciliary ring diameter, and power were measured at each step. All parameters were plotted as a function of age. The age-dependence of the Indian and American Eye-Bank eyes were compared.

Results: : There were no observable quantitative differences in any of the parameters between the two datasets. In both datasets, the unstretched and stretched lens diameter increased with age (combined, in mm: 8.27+0.032*Age and 8.73+0.022*Age). The unstretched and maximally stretched power decreased with age (combined, in D: 42.2-0.54*Age and 30.9-0.25*Age. The maximum load was independent of age (combined, in g: 8.9+/-3.11).No accommodative response was observed in eyes older than 50 years of age.

Conclusions: : There are no measureable difference in the size, power and optomechanical response of human crystalline lenses in eyes from Indian and American Eye Banks.Support: NIH EY14225; Australian Federal Government CRC Scheme through the Vision Cooperative Research Centre; Florida Lions Eye Bank; Dr Rakhi Jain , AMO Inc, Santa Ana, CA; NIH center grant P30-EY014801; Research to Prevent Blindness. Henri and Flore Lesieur Foundation (JMP).

Keywords: accomodation • cataract • presbyopia 
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