April 2009
Volume 50, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2009
Lipid and Protein Removal from a Silicone Hydrogel Lens (lotrafilcon A) by a Rub versus a No-rub Multipurpose Solution Using Infrared Analysis of Clinically Worn Lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. H. Powell
    R & D, Advanced Medical Optics, Santa Ana, California
  • L. D. Hoong
    R & D, Advanced Medical Optics, Santa Ana, California
  • S. W. Huth
    R & D, Advanced Medical Optics, Santa Ana, California
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships  C.H. Powell, Advanced Medical Optics, E; L.D. Hoong, Advanced Medical Optics, E; S.W. Huth, Advanced Medical Optics, E.
  • Footnotes
    Support  None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2009, Vol.50, 6334. doi:
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      C. H. Powell, L. D. Hoong, S. W. Huth; Lipid and Protein Removal from a Silicone Hydrogel Lens (lotrafilcon A) by a Rub versus a No-rub Multipurpose Solution Using Infrared Analysis of Clinically Worn Lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2009;50(13):6334.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: : The effective reduction of bio-burden (including Fusarium and Acanthamoeba) from lens surfaces by digital rubbing has been well proven. The potential for also removing much smaller entities (e.g. proteins and lipids) by a rub-rinse regimen is a less established but reasonable expectation. This study compares real-world (clinical) cleanliness of a silicone hydrogel lens (Focus Night & Day) used one month in daily wear mode with a rub-regimen MPS (COMPLETE Easy Rub, CER) versus a no-rub-regimen MPS (OPTI-FREE Express, OFX). A Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method is used in quantifying extracted lipid and protein from the lenses.

Methods: : Lenses were obtained from the same 15 patients (30 eyes) for each regimen from a sequential 30-day daily-wear study with use of a no-rub regimen (with OFX) versus a rub regimen (with CER). The analyst was masked regarding lens treatment. Clinically harvested lenses were each extracted with 2 mL of tert-butyl-methyl ether (TBME). The solvent was evaporated and residue was reconstituted in 50 µL of TBME. A 20-µL portion was spotted onto a thin Teflon film and air dried. The film was scanned by FTIR, and lipid (1725 cm-1) and protein (1545 cm-1) peaks were used for the respective quantifications.

Results: : Less than half the levels of both lipid and protein were recovered from lenses used with the rub regimen (CER) than with the no-rub regimen (OFX). Average lipid levels were 3.4µg/lens with rub (CER) and 7.2µg/lens with the no-rub (OFX), while protein levels were 0.7µg/lens with rub (CER) and 2.0µg/lens with no-rub (OFX). Differences were significant or trended toward significance (p0.05).

Conclusions: : FTIR analysis of clinically worn Focus Night & Day silicone hydrogel lenses showed significant improvement of lens cleanliness with regards to both lipid and protein by use of a rub-regimen product (CER) versus a no-rub regimen product (OFX). FTIR was assessed to be a viable means of quantifying lipid and protein as general categories of lens deposits.

Keywords: contact lens • clinical laboratory testing 
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