May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Fibrin Clot Formation in the Anterior Chamber After Orthotopic Corneal Transplantation in Mice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Netuková-Sosnová
    Ophthalmology, Vinohrady teaching Hospital Prague, Prague 10, Czech Republic
  • P. Kuchynka
    Ophthalmology, Vinohrady teaching Hospital Prague, Prague 10, Czech Republic
  • J. V. Forrester
    Ophthalmology, IMS, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships M. Netuková-Sosnová, None; P. Kuchynka, None; J.V. Forrester, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support Development Trust of the University of Aberdeen
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 196. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      M. Netuková-Sosnová, P. Kuchynka, J. V. Forrester; Fibrin Clot Formation in the Anterior Chamber After Orthotopic Corneal Transplantation in Mice. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):196.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: To investigate the role of and quantify fibrin clot formation and bone marrow-derived cell infiltration in the anterior chamber at various time points after orthotopic corneal transplantation in mice.

Methods:: Syngeneic and allogeneic corneal grafts at various times (0-15 days) after engraftment were examined in wholemount preparation by confocal microscopy by evaluating the extent of posterior corneal surface area covered by fibrin clot. The cells infiltrating the clot were also examined using single and dual immunostaining for morphology and phenotype.

Results:: In both allogeneic and syngeneic corneal grafts, a fine fibrin clot covering the posterior corneal surface was easily detectable 1 hour after transplantation. The fibrin clot covering the endothelium became more dense and increased progressively to reach a peak 6h after allograft and 48 hours after syngraft, a difference that was statisitically significant (n=4 for each time point, p<0.05). Thereafter the fibrin clot contracted and gradually dissolved and completely disappeared 14 days after grafting. By 24 hours numerous cells infiltrate the clot. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the majority were CD45+ leukocytes, many of which were CD11b+ and F4/80+ macrophages.

Conclusions:: Fibrin formation in the anterior chamber after corneal graft serves as a meshwork permitting the access of immune cells to the posterior corneal surface and particularly the donor endothelium. The main source of immune cells involved in endothelial rejection derive from the anterior uveal tract. In addition, procoagulant macrophages are probably instrumental in clot development and subsequent contraction.

Keywords: cornea: endothelium • transplantation 
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