May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
The Associations of Eye Dominance and Laterality With Refractive Error and Axial Length in Singaporean School Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Chia
    Paediatric Services, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore, Singapore
  • A. Jaurigue
    National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
  • G. Gazzard
    Institute of Ophthalmology, UK, United Kingdom
  • Y. Wang
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore
  • D. Tan
    Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore
  • R. A. Stone
    University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • S. Saw
    National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships A. Chia, None; A. Jaurigue, None; G. Gazzard, None; Y. Wang, None; D. Tan, None; R.A. Stone, None; S. Saw, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support NMRC/095/2005
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1017. doi:
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      A. Chia, A. Jaurigue, G. Gazzard, Y. Wang, D. Tan, R. A. Stone, S. Saw; The Associations of Eye Dominance and Laterality With Refractive Error and Axial Length in Singaporean School Children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1017.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: The purpose of this study is to explore effect of dominance and laterality on refractive error and axial length.

Methods:: Eye dominance was assessed using the hole-in-the-card test in 543 children during their 2006 follow-up visit in the Singapore Cohort study Of the Risk factors for Myopia (SCORM) study. Data were compared to cycloplegic refractions and axial lengths measured by ultrasound.

Results:: The spherical equivalent refraction was essentially the same between right and left eyes, although there was a small but statistically significant longer axial length in right eyes. Right and left eye dominance was noted in 58% and 30% of subjects, respectively. There was no significant difference in spherical equivalent refraction [-2.56+/-2.46D (mean +/- standard deviation) versus -2.45+/-2.52D, P=0.22] or axial length (24.36+/-1.19mm versus 24.32+/-1.18mm, P=0.05) between dominant and non-dominant eyes. In subjects with anisometropia ≥0.5D, dominant eyes were more myopic in 52%. Dominant eyes had less astigmatic power (-0.88+/-0.80D versus -1.00+/-0.92D, p<0.001). On analyzing changes over the prior 5 years, there was no significant difference in spherical equivalence but a small increase in axial length in the dominant eye (1.04+/-0.66mm versus 0.99+/-0.66mm, p=0.01).

Conclusions:: Spherical equivalent and changes in spherical equivalent refractions were not associated with eye dominance, but slightly less astigmatism and minimally greater increases in axial length were noted in the dominant eye. From a clinical perspective, the differences in astigmatism and axial length were extremely small, and eye dominance and laterality had very little effect on refractive error or on myopic progression.

Keywords: refractive error development 
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