May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
A Study of Tears Antioxidant Content in the Ageing Eye: Implications for Dry Eye Prevention and Treatment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Choy
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong
    School of Optometry,
  • P. Cho
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong
    School of Optometry,
  • I. Benzie
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, Hong Kong
    Department of Health Technology and Informatics,
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships C. Choy, None; P. Cho, None; I. Benzie, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support 8.52.37.ZZ1K
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 1917. doi:
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      C. Choy, P. Cho, I. Benzie; A Study of Tears Antioxidant Content in the Ageing Eye: Implications for Dry Eye Prevention and Treatment. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1917.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: Dry eye syndrome is a common age-related disorder, and decreased antioxidant/ultraviolet radiation protection in tears may be part of the cause. This study compared the amount of antioxidant supply through the tears fluid to ocular surface (as the Tear Antioxidant Supply (TAS)) in young and elderly adults.

Methods:: Reflex tears were collected from 120 healthy young (n = 58; mean±SD age = 23±3 years) and elderly (n = 62; mean±SD age = 58±6 years) subjects. Tear flow rates were measured. Tear samples were analyzed for total antioxidant content (as the Ferric Reducing/Antioxidant Power).

Results:: TAS (in nmol/min) is calculated by the tears antioxidant concentration multiplied by tears flow rate. Result showed that the TAS of older subjects (2.06±1.89 nmol/min) was significantly lower (P<0.0001) than that of younger subjects (4.75±2.46 nmol/min).

Conclusions:: Our findings support the hypothesis that tear antioxidative protection is lower in elderly people. The new data presented here are consistent with previous findings in other ocular tissues or fluids showing that the levels of some antioxidants in the aqueous and crystalline lens decrease with age. These antioxidant-related changes are reported to be directly associated with the development of various kinds of age-related ocular diseases, including cataract and age-related maculopathy. Hence, there is considerable interest in the possible role of tear antioxidants in dry eye syndrome.

Keywords: cornea: tears/tear film/dry eye • antioxidants • aging 
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