May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Evaluation of an in situ Forming Hydrogel as a Vitreous Substitute
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • K. E. Swindle
    Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
    Energy, Environmental, and Chemical Engineering,
    Research,
    Veterans Affairs - John Cochran, St. Louis, Missouri
  • P. D. Hamilton
    Research,
    Veterans Affairs - John Cochran, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Y.-B. Shui
    Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
  • D. C. Beebe
    Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Cell Biology and Physiology,
  • S. Kaushal
    Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
  • N. Ravi
    Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri
    Energy, Environmental, and Chemical Engineering, Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences,
    Chief of Staff,
    Veterans Affairs - John Cochran, St. Louis, Missouri
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships K.E. Swindle, None; P.D. Hamilton, None; Y. Shui, None; D.C. Beebe, None; S. Kaushal, None; N. Ravi, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support VA Merit Review Grant to Nathan Ravi, NIH Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 2247. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      K. E. Swindle, P. D. Hamilton, Y.-B. Shui, D. C. Beebe, S. Kaushal, N. Ravi; Evaluation of an in situ Forming Hydrogel as a Vitreous Substitute. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):2247.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose:
 

We developed polymeric hydrogels that form in situ as potential vitreous substitutes. The use of a disulfide crosslinker enables the polymer to be injected as a liquid and form a gel by reacting with oxygen. Rheological testing was performed to compare the viscoelastic properties of the hydrogels to that of the porcine vitreous and the polymers were gelled under simulated physiological conditions.

 
Methods:
 

Hydrogels were prepared as previously described (Aliyar et al., Biomacromolecules, 6, 204, 2005). The polymer formulation was modified to contain 4.5% disulfide crosslinker and 3.0% hydrophobic monomer. The molecular weight was determined using Viscotek HPLC-GPC. Hydrogels were prepared at 2% and 3% (w/w) concentrations in water. Gelation was tested in simulated physiological conditions by equilibrating the reduced polymer in 18 mm Spectra/Por dialysis tubing in DPBS under a controlled oxygen concentration of 5%. The mechanical properties of the porcine vitreous and hydrogels were determined using a Vilastic-3 oscillatory capillary tube rheometer.

 
Results:
 

The number average molecular weight of the polymer was 207.2 kDa with 0% below a molecular weight of 10 kDa. The hydrogel formulation gelled in 1 hour under simulated physiological conditions in the dialysis tubing. The storage and loss modulus of the 2% hydrogel formulation matched those of the natural porcine vitreous.

 
Conclusions:
 

This in situ forming hydrogel has viscoelastic properties close to that of the natural vitreous and gels in 1 hour at a reduced oxygen concentration similar to that of the eye. Previous in vitro toxicity tests coupled with the current in vitro gelling studies indicate that this hydrogel formulation will be a good candidate for in vivo testing.  

 
Keywords: vitreous substitutes • vitreous • vitreoretinal surgery 
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