May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Microscope Based Laser Doppler Flowmeter for Rodent Use
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Strohmaier
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austria
  • R. Werkmeister
    Medical Physics, Vienna Medical University, Vienna, Austria
  • G. Grabner
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austria
  • B. Tockner
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austria
  • B. Bogner
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austria
  • C. Runge
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austria
  • A. Bachernegg
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austria
  • L. Schmetterer
    Medical Physics, Vienna Medical University, Vienna, Austria
  • H. A. Reitsamer
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, Paracelsus University, Salzburg, Austria
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships C. Strohmaier, None; R. Werkmeister, None; G. Grabner, None; B. Tockner, None; B. Bogner, None; C. Runge, None; A. Bachernegg, None; L. Schmetterer, None; H.A. Reitsamer, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support Fuchs Stiftung; Adele Rabensteiner Stiftung
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 2265. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      C. Strohmaier, R. Werkmeister, G. Grabner, B. Tockner, B. Bogner, C. Runge, A. Bachernegg, L. Schmetterer, H. A. Reitsamer; Microscope Based Laser Doppler Flowmeter for Rodent Use. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):2265.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: To develop a non-invasive microscope based laser Doppler blood flowmeter for rodent use.

Methods:: Based on the theory of Bonner and Nossal, a number proportional to blood flow in capillaries can be calculated as the product of mean velocity of erythrocytes and the concentration of moving erythrocytes in the tissue. In our setup, both values are derived from processing the Doppler shifted signal of a laser beam (811 nm) that is directed to the tissue of interest. The laser diode as well as the detector are mounted on a microscope, one eye piece has a CCD camera attached to check the illumination site of the laser. The analysis is done by software based on the LabView developing environment.

Results:: Previous pharmacological studies on the effect of L-NAME on choroidal blood flow were repeated in mice, rats and rabbits. Measurements were performed using a PeriFlux System 5000 flowmeter with a standard probe (411) as a control device. The measurements generated the same results as found in previous studies using L-NAME with good correlation between the flow values of the Periflux flowmeter and the device presented in this study. In mice and rats the Doppler shifts are generated by the retinal and the choroidal circulation, whereas in rabbits the signal was generated by the choroidal circulation only.

Conclusions:: The presented microscope provides a valid, non-invasive measurement of blood flow blood flow in ocular tissues.

Keywords: blood supply • choroid • laser 
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