May 2007
Volume 48, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   May 2007
Neuroprotection in Non-Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • L. A. Mawn
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • R. Sappington
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • D. Calkins
    Dept of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships L.A. Mawn, None; R. Sappington, None; D. Calkins, None.
  • Footnotes
    Support None.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 2007, Vol.48, 2455. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      L. A. Mawn, R. Sappington, D. Calkins; Neuroprotection in Non-Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):2455.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose:: To determine whether topical glaucoma medications such as brimonidine tartrate, latanoprost, dorzolamide or timolol provide neuroprotection for the second, uninvolved eye of patients with acute non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy or prevents progression if both eyes involved at initial presentation with acute non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION).

Methods:: We performed a retrospective review of patients with NAION who were treated with intraocular pressure lowering drops and had follow up for at least 12 months. All of these patients were treated over the follow up period with intraocular pressure lowering drops. Three of these patients were initially treated brimonidine, four latanoprost, and one timoptic.

Results:: Eight NAION patients were treated with intraocular pressure lowering medication. One of the bilateral NAION patients developed progression of visual field loss when he began taking blood pressure medication at bedtime and none of the unilateral NAION patients developed visual loss in the second eye.

Conclusions:: Topical intraocular pressure medications, given to protect against NAION progression in the involved eye and development of NAION in the non affected eye may be a potential beneficial treatment strategy.

Keywords: neuro-ophthalmology: optic nerve • neuroprotection • optic nerve 
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